Power strips with long cords and many outlets?

I am looking for a source of power strips or surge suppressors with 15 to 20 foot cords and eight or more outlets.
We have several offices with lots of low power devices (laptop, printer, stapler, computer speakers, etc.), and we need to get compliance with the fire marshal.
I can find 8 and 9 outlet strips locally, and I can find strips with 15 foot cords locally, but not in combination.
Suggestions?
Thanks.
Rick
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I have never seen a power strip with a long cord. Just get an "applicance" extension cord and plug the power strips into that. An "appliance" extension cord is a short extension cord that uses heavy gauge wire (#12). I imagine that the fire marshall would be OK with that, but it never hurts to ask fisrt.
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scott snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

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Why not just run a few new circuits to new outlets the areas you need power? Then use commonly found surge supressors from the new outlets.

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Code calls for wall receptacles within every six feet of wall just for this reason. Installation of power strips with long power cords are a more significant source of deadly fires. If receptacles are more than 10 feet away, then that room requires more wall receptacles installed. This is doubly true of offices with many electrical office machines. There is absolutely no reason to be running long power cords to power numerous office machines. None. If the office has that many machines, then more wall receptacles are required. Not just for code compliance. This should be obviously necessary for human safety.
BTW any minimally acceptable power strip must have a 15 amp breaker included. Many sold without that breaker are further reasons for fires that, in one local case, killed a whole kennel of dogs. The most important feature in any power strip is a 15 amp circuit breaker.
Power strips with surge protectors? Then you want to throw money away (spend tens of times more money for ineffective protectors) and maybe even make office machine damage easier. Use power strips and do not use power strip surge protectors. Office electronic protection that actually works is located elsewhere and costs less.
Rick Matthews wrote:

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I've got several Belkin power strips, with 15' cords, and 10 outlets.. I got them at home depot.. they are surge supressors (for what a surge supressor in a power strip is worth..)
I like them because I can fit 6 wall warts on them, and still use the other 4 outlets for regular cords.. if the wall warts are small enough, you can fit 10..
model # F9D1000-15 unfortunately, a search of Belkin's website fails to locate them, and their search function appears to be braindead.
A similar model without the surge supressors is available from Tripp-Lite/Waber.
http://www.waber.com/products/product.cfm?productID 61 model UL800CB-15
here's a 12 outlet rack mount version (but not as flexible for wall warts..)
http://www.waber.com/products/product.cfm?productID 4 model RS-1215-HG
Tripp-Lite also has the ISOBAR12, similar to the RS-1215-HG, with better surge supression/power filtering..
http://www.waber.com/products/suppressors/isobar.cfm#10
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YYZedd wrote:

The office layout lends itself to an L-shaped desk with the gadgets on the section away from the wall. Eight foot cords will probably do it for this situation, but a little longer makes it easier to route beneath the desk.
We could put outlets in the floor here, but it would mean cutting into the slab.
We have a lot of other locations in labs where the distance needs are more than eight feet.
Rick
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w_tom wrote:

We have an L-shaped desk with laptop and peripherals at the remote end from the wall. More wall outlets would be of no help at all. We could cut the slab and put in an 8 or 10 outlet cluster in the floor, but that seems like overkill to me. Floor outlets carry their own safety risks, too.
The power strip and cord will be secured, not subject to abrasion or flexing. Total ampacity of the equipment is less than half the rated capacity of a 15A strip, and of course I would only get a breaker-protected strip.
Perhaps not the ultimate in safety, but if we were striving for the ultimate we would swap out all our breakers for arc-faults and add GFCI protection as well.

Agreed.
Surge protection is not a priority for this application, but please elaborate. What provides better surge protection at lower cost?
Thanks.
Rick
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Bob Vaughan wrote:

Thanks! Just picked them up.
Rick
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To be effective at the appliance, a power strip must somehow stop, block, or absorb the transient. It will stop what miles of sky could not? Of course not. So they just forget to mention what it does and what it does not do. They say only enough for others to wildly speculate.
Protection has always been about earthing before a transient gets near to transistors. Same as Franklin did to keep transients from finding earth ground via church steeples. Protection that is even standard at your telco's switching computer. Every wire that enters a building must be earthed. Either by a short and direct hardwire connection (cable TV) or via a 'whole house' protector (telephone, AC electric). Protection so effective and so inexpensive that your telco already installs a 'whole house' protector where their line enters your building. Yes, the phone lines already have effective protection. Just another little fact that those plug-in protector manufacturers forget to mention.
The most common source of destructive transients is AC electric. And yet that is the one utility that has no effective protection; unless you install it. Effective 'whole house' protector for residential AC electric is sold in Home Depot (Intermatic IG1240RC) or in Lowes (Cutler Hammer or GE). Other manufacturers include Siemens, GE, Leviton, Square D, Polyphaser, Furse, etc.
But the bottom line is this. A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Ineffective protectors avoid discussing earthing. They may even try to confuse the issue by mentioning ground. But earthing, as Franklin demonstrated in 1752, is the protection. No dedicated earthing alone will identify ineffective protectors. The concepts were detailed in at least three posts in "Is it safe to use computer during lightning/thunder storm?" in the newsgroup sci.electronics.basics on 22 Sept 2004 at http://tinyurl.com/5odg3
Plug-in protectors cost maybe $15 or $50 per protected appliance. Then it forgets to mention the type of transients it does not protect from. Effective 'whole house' protector costs about $1 per protected appliance - and provide protection from all types of transients. Technical reasons provided in previous posts (with citations).
Rick wrote:

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w_tom wrote:

Don't forget to stand back.
Rick
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