Power Pole q. PG&E

I noticed our power pole lacked a cable that countered the pull of the lines. Someone had cut it. It had an insulator in the middle of the cable , what is the insulator for? and who responsibility is this pole, the meter reader seems to think that since the pole is on our property and serves only us, that PG&E will not replace the somewhat rotted pole. any ideas , out there? Patriotism is supporting your country all the time and the government when it deserves it. -Mark Twain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Call the service line and report it to them. The meter reader is not qualified to make this decision. Generally speaking the power company owns everything up to your "service point" which is usually the splice at your service mast drip loop. You will notice the wire size changes there too. The customer usually owns a service lateral (underground) out to the street. Local tariffs are the final word but the folks at the service desk will have that answer. It is a lot easier to replace a guy wire now than to replace a pole after a storm so they may just come fix it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
veteran wrote:

Yup! Like Greg said, the utility is responsible for everything up to the weatherhead. They will core the pole and replace it if necessary. That "cable" is called a guy wire. The insulator is so that, if the upper portion becomes hot for some reason ( short, lightning, etc.) and you touch the lower portion, you won't get shocked. Most poles set have a ground wire from the top to the base of the pole. But if you look at most old poles, a lot of the wire is missing from folks that figure the copper is more valuable to them. ( Don't try this at home, every foot of the wire is stamped with the utility's initials. At least since the 80's. Not that the scrapper looks! But revenue recovery does!) So you can't count on the pole's ground to protect you and the insulator is insurance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In TN the 'copper' grounding wire on the pole is steel with a copper flashing.
--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nick Hull wrote:

Bet that cuts down on the theft!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In most (if not all) states, if the pole contains the meter, it is the responsibility of the power company. If it's AFTER your main breaker, then it is your problem. Dont ask the meter reader, call the power company and ask for the repair dept. Meter readers only read meters!
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Generally, the utility is responsible for overhead electric line up to (something like) 150 feet from the 'right of way'. After that, the overhead wire is your property. If wire is underground, then you may be responsible for everything up to the pole or up to the 'right of way'. Your electric company may have different criteria. Talk to them.
Since meter readers are becoming a obsolete job, then many electric companies are hiring third party companies to perform the reading. IOW meter readers may not even know anything about electric company other than how to read a meter and where to file the papers.
veteran wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the pole is on your property and not on a right of way then it's your problem, not theirs.
I have 2 friends who live on "flagstaff" properties, basically the rear acre of what used to be a 2-acre deep lot.
Our utility will feed a home directly from their pole only if that distance is 75' or less. Any further than that you have to either go underground to meet their pole (and your entire underground service is your responsibility, even if it must cross to the other side of the street to meet a pole) or, intall your own pole on your own property. The utility will install it for you, for a price, but with the proviso that you are paying only for the labor and materials and their pole-setting prowess. After they're done the pole is your property, your responsibility.

snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is Turtle.
I have never heard of a Power company not have full responciabilty for any wire or pole installed on private or public property. This just does not happen in the real world. If what you say the wire and pole is your resonciability then you can do this. Call the power company and tell them that the wire and pole is my responciability and can do as I please and will be re routing the wire to make a new service drop to my Barn which you will not have to cut the power off to the lines for i will just throw a steel pole across the wires to blow the transformer trip fuses and you stay away from here for it is not your responciability to do any work on these private service lines on my property. The Sheriff department and the Power company rep. will show up to see what your doing. You will find out that NO property owner or Electrician is allowed to climb a public service pole to do anything without the Power company's permission until the service hits the pecker head or meter pan. Also you will find out that no body will go up that pole who does not work for or contract to the Power company.
Have you been up any power company poles lately ?
TURTLE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where I live, we have to read our own meters and send in a card with the readings every month. If we forget to send it in (or call it in which they allow but hate), they estimate the charges for one month. If we forget for two months, they send out a meter reader, and bill us $25 for the guy to come. They also send out a truck crew once a year or so, to (as they say) inspect the wires. I believe they are really checking the meter readings ot be sure we are not lying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In many places, meter readers have now been replaced by radio waves.
snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes my meter reader only has to point the tranceiver through the fence to get the reading.
I understand now there's newer meters which "transmit" their reading through the power lines upon command prompts sent through the power lines. snipped-for-privacy@aol.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No meter reader goes out. Looking closely at poles, one may spot gray cubes with antenna. They in turn retransmit the meter data to other transceivers. No meter reader exists. No power line communication is used (which remains too unreliable for utility requirements). Utility reads meters using transceivers and repeaters without leaving the control center. Utility also quickly identifies local power outages.
HaHaHa wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your neighborhood is not representative of the whole world, Tom. My meter is on the outside of the house and the fellow who reads it is named Paul. He's pretty sure he exists.
BB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.