Power drill/driver

I've accepted that my power drill/driver disappeared last year, though I've still got one battery and the charger. I need to decide what kind of replacement to get.
Do I need 18V? I assume not. My intended uses are in the home, including renovation: putting up drywall, mounting cabinet doors. I doubt I'll want to drill masonry on my own. I also assume I don't want a hammer driver.
Of what's available at Home Depot or Lowe's, what's recommended? What considerations are there? Some of the products are distinguish from each other only by features whose usefulness to me I can't ascertain.
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On Nov 29, 12:19 pm, Harlan Messinger

There are tool reviews from a few places like Consumer Reports, Popular Mechanics and more. If I was looking I would consider a kit where you get many tools. Maybe Ryobi the line has the most tools. LiIon wont last as many years as Nicad but are lighter. I had a 9.6v Makita that did all I ever needed till it was stolen. HD Ridgid brand has a lifetime warranty even on batteries, thats what I went to. For around home 12v is more than enough and I find myself picking the lighest tool most often a 9.6v. There are some real small, ight, LiIon mini tools that are nice. B&D is not going to do much work before its broke. Getsomething that the batteries and charger work with other tools, a Ridgid charger charges 9.6 up to 18v, im sure other companies offer this.
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Harlan Messinger wrote:

Don't you want to use the spare battery and charger for your next drill? I got a De Walt 14V screw driver and drill kit which has been good to me.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Are the batteries interchangeable among manufacturers? I'd thought of that. I still have to check what my remaining battery's voltage *is*. It's marked on neither the battery nor the charger. I need to drag out my voltmeter.
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Depends on how you actually use the tool. IMO, 18V stuff is just too heavy for 95% of typical homeowner use. I have a 15.6V Panasonic that I love because of the weight/power ratio. I bought a 12V Rigid for one of the guys to use in the shop where he was going to be working on a ladder or lift. Plenty of power for driving small sheet metal screws and gets the job done for $49.
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isn't there one brand that offers free replacement battery packs? Ryobi?
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Ditto on that. I got an 18v Dewalt for a gift, after previously owning 9.6 Makita for decades. I still get out the 9.6 for smaller jobs, as it is lighter. I would like a battery hammer drill, and a handheld screwdriver for those times when those would do best. One size does not do all.
Steve
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2008 18:55:50 -0800, SteveB wrote:

Avoid the DeWalt DW925 hammerdrill. In fact, I would avoid DeWalt all together. I got the DW925 hammerdrill as part of a kit. The locking chuck does not lock, dropping drill bits all the time. The clutch is worthless, driving deck screws through the wood on setting 1. I have had the set for a little over a year. I am on my 3rd drill! Give me a Milwaukee any day. Or a Makita or Hitachi. Porter Cable used to make good stuff, but now bought out by B&D.
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Personally, 18v is too heavy for me.
I find 14.4 plenty powerful for light - medium use in the shop around the house, etc.
I went with Ridgid for the lifetime warranty on the NiCd batteries. Lifetime -- figure that should pay off in the long run. But again, if I wanted the most power, best feel, I might go with some other brand.
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IMO: -- variable speed -- Two max speeds (drill bits and screw bits) -- Reversible -- Nice if there's a stop clutch to stop spinning upon release of trigger -- Two batteries (one in use, one charging) -- Variable Clutch -- No key chuck needed to change bits/drivers.
My last driver drill has those features & it's the best I ever had.
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I have been using Ryobi for several years with good luck..For the occasional around the house use it's more than enough...No need to spend big bucks unless you feel the need to impress someone. I bought a whole box full of Ryobi cordless tools for what you would spend for just the Makita or DeWalt drill/driver and it all works fine... I especially like the cordless sawzall and skillsaw...It great not having to drag a cord out for a couple of cuts...I have the 18 volt stuff....
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2008 13:19:05 -0500, Harlan Messinger

I'll throw in a pitch that you consider adding a power screwdriver to your tool kit, not a "drill" shaped one, but one shaped like a fat screwdriver. I've been using them for years, my latest one is a Hitachi and it's got plenty of power, two speeds, fwd-reverse, and spindle lock so you can also drive manually if need be. Fast battery charge, something like 45 minutes, came with two batteries. I rarely use my battery powered drill for driving screws unless it's a really big job and I want to drive them fast - the drill will drive them quite a bit faster then the powered screwdriver. But the PS is really convenient for 95% of the stuff I usually do and much easier to control to avoid stripping out the head of the screw and gets into tight areas the drill won't.
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Ashton Crusher wrote:

The idea seems appealing given that the screwdrivers aren't expensive, now that I've taken a look at them, and are obviously lighter. Thanks.
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On Nov 29, 12:19 pm, Harlan Messinger

One nice feature is a light that illuminates the surface you are drilling, the ridgid I have has a light but it misses my work area, some new Liion have a battery gauge. With 2 speed for home use the smallest unit works, my 3v screwdriver still gets worked since its light and so does my cheapo 4.8v B&D and I have 12 and 18v heavy stuff. If its going to be real occasional use LiIon might not be good for you as I have heard batteries last 2-4 years, just like your cell phone. I have old Makita packs from 1984 that are finally dead and many from the 90s that still work so LiIon hasnt passed the longevity test yet. For someone that uses a tool every day LiIon may be great but a replacement 18v LiIon Ridgid battery the one with most amps is like 110.00 with tax, the tool was maybe only 120 with the smaller amp 18v LiIon. So you get the tool for free these days but pay retail for new batteries.
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i got a 18v ryobi with the flashlight,2 batts,cgrger,case at hd for 69.00 . i had a 12 volt sears before.that ryobi is a much better quality and power,but it is heavy compared to the sears. my sears drill is still good,just has bad batteries now that are more than a new drill with batteries.
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On Sun, 30 Nov 2008 10:38:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

You might be able to buy raw batteries and replace the individual cells. I did that about a year ago with my cordless razor and now have almost double the original capacity for only a few $$$!!!!
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There's a company called Primecell. They rebuild battery packs, and have a good reputation.
PRIMECELL rebuilds your packs with better than original batteries, excellent service, reasonable price
http://www.primecell.com/pctools.htm
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Harlan Messinger wrote:

Why didn't you buy the Ryobi 18V drill/circular saw/lamp/vacuum cleaner/one battery combination for $60 on Black Friday at Home Depot (not crowded) and get the in-store coupon for one free Ryobi 18V device worth up to $89.95, such as two battery packs or a cordless hammer drill w/ one battery?
An 18V Ryobis aren't as powerful as 14-18V drills from DeWalt, Porter Cable, Hitachi, Makita, Bosch, Ridgid, or Panasonic, but they cost less and have 2-year warranties (get a model with the shiftable gearbox, not the one-speed gearbox, which is worse -- both types have infinite electronic speed selection). Ridgid power tools are warranted for life, including the battery.
If you have 120VAC available and you don't need to drill in a steam bath or while standing in water or an aluminum ladder, why not get a corded drill instead? A really good one costs less than a cheap cordless.
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