Powder coated paints - diy?

I was in Harbor Freight over the weekend and happened to notice that they sell containers of powder coated paints. Is this a diy project? What kind of temp is required to set the paint?
Bob
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Bob wrote:

Sure, if you have an electrostatically charged powder gun and a method of getting the part to be at ground potential. Apply the powder and then (while maintaining the charge) bake at 160 to 210 degrees for the proper amount of time. Make sure that you prep the part by the Clean, Rinse, Derust, Rinse, Iron Phosphate treatment, Rinse, Acidulated Rinse process to assure good adhesion.
You can eliminate the need for the EC gun if you have an electrostatic tunnel.
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The Indianapolis office of Tektronix(back where there still was one) had their office desks and file cabinets repainted -in the office-(a different color!)by electrostatic painting,and there was NO baking required. I believe it was powder-coating. It was done over a weekend when there was no one in the office.
It was a very neat job,too.
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Finding the keyboard operational Jim Yanik entered:

You had desks? Woodbridge, NJ had a 4x8 sheet of plywood on milk crates for 12 techs. And only on outlet. Just kidding. IIRC electrostatic painting can be a DIY project if you layout the $ for the equipment, There used to be an outfit around here that would do all your kitchen appliances the same color in your house.
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The desks were in the OFFICE section(sales),not the service dept.,where we had 4x8 composite slabs on top of file cabinets for workbenches,and very satisfactory,especially to the 'new' cramped cubicles they forced Chicago and other TEK field service centers to use for work,putting style over function,as if they were some fancy display for customers.
The laughable part is that shortly after that waste of TEK money,Tektronix CLOSED all the field service centers,with the sales offices following soon after.
Woodbridge,huh? Did you know Joe V or Wayne in TV service??
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Finding the keyboard operational Jim Yanik entered:

Ah the sales office, that explains a lot. We didn't interact with them alot after a really poor year end bonus caused one of the salesmen in front of all the techs, "If I knew the bonus was going to be so small, I would have sold more." I remember Wayne but lost touch with him many years ago. Same with Joe V. I did keep in touch with Keith T. until a couple of years back. I can't remember the exact years I was there other then the early '80s. John Holme was the manager. Bob
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I doubt it was powder coat. It is liquid paint that is charged one way and the piece the other. The paint is sucked onto the furniture so there is no overspray and minimal cleanup.

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Cliff Hartle wrote:

Well, it was labelled "Powder Coat", came in 1 pint containers, contained a powder mix, and came in black, yellow, & white colors. I assumed that since it was labelled "powder coat" that it probably was, but having no experience with the product, I and they could be wrong.
Bob
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Bob wrote:

Although there are different processes for powder coating, it MUST be baked on or it is not powdercoating. If it is not baked on, then it is just painting.
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Robert Allison wrote:

Which brings up another question: When a powder coated object becomes chipped, how does one repair the damage? In other words, will standard paint adher to power coated paint?
Bob
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My deck furniture is powder coated. At about 20 years old, it has a few chips. I sanded to blend the edge and repainted with regular spray paint. Not as good as the real deal, but an OK touchup. Color match was easy as it is white.
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Bob wrote:

Sure, with the proper preparation, it is as easy as anything else. Your paint will probably stick to the powdercoating better than it will to the exposed metal.
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I have a friend that does small parts for car restoration. He built a small paint booth in his garage and uses a yard sell oven for heat and got his spray gun at Northern. From what I have seen the work turns out pretty good. Last stuff I saw was some drum brake parts for his 'tang.
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