Post-mailbox repair ideas?

I've got a post mailbox that has been partially destroyed by the snow plow and I'm looking for ideas to repair it. It is a 4x4 post anchored in the ground with concrete which I really don't want to have to dig out if it can be avoided. And, for that matter can't while the ground is frozen solid. The post is shaped like a 7 with the mail box fastened to the top of the 7. After last winter, the upper part of the post split so I ran bolts through it to pull it back together. This year, that repair failed and it split even more. So I'm left with approximately 2 feet of solid post sticking out of the ground. Does anyone make a clamp that could slip over the remaining base, which could then support adding on another 2ft of post that I could attach the mailbox to? Or?? Looking for repair ideas to last at least until the ground thaws, which here in Wisconsin is at least 6 weeks away.
Thanks
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For a short term fix, you could attach another 2 ft of post by sitting the new 2ft on top of the 'stump' and splicing together with metal plates and lag screws or coated nails. It won't be all that strong but possibly would hold up until you could fix it properly.
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sitting
metal
strong but

you can put this on the stub:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdC415-1518-MB-122B&lpage=none
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plow
the
it can

solid.
the 7.

through
split
sticking out

remaining
could
least
away.
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Travis Jordan wrote:

Oops, I was a little too fast on the 'post' button that time.
My question to you is, who is responsible when the snow plow runs into your mailbox? Doesn't the snow plow contractor / municipality have some liability in this matter?
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Travis Jordan wrote:

In some areasit is illegal to have a solid mailbox post next to road, considered a danger to drivers.
Ignoring that issue, however, as mentioned you can use metal plates to reconnect, or, I have used scrap pieces of 2X4s to "sandwich" together pieces of wood like this....if you have the broken pieces of the post, you could probably salvage enough of that to do this....of course, you'd need long lags of you use a 4X4.....Basically use wood as a fastening plate rather than the galvanized you commonly see.
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In our town the highway department took responsibility. The post was set back far enough from the road that there was no reason for them to hit it. The town was responsive and paid for a "reasonable" replacement, in other words same type post and mailbox as was destroyed.
original message "> My question to you is, who is responsible when the snow plow runs into

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Some, not all, will pay up to $50 for repair if the plow itself hit the mailbox. However, if it is just the force of the snow that damages the box, you're out of luck. You can imagine the force that snow has when that truck is up to a full head of steam and going 40+ mph clearing our last 8 inch snowfall.

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ok wrote:

Sorry, but sitting here in my office where it is 71 degrees and sunny the image is beyond me.
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For a short term repair, just splint it with a couple of 2x4s.
For a long term repair, you obvously need to move the post, and put in a long swing-arm.
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I have two suggestions. Do as I did, buy one of the plastic mail boxes and they will slip right over the stub you now have and just bolt it on. I like it better myself. Mine is a Rubbermaid product as I recall.
Second idea is to cut a ~ 30 angle in the stub and a matching angle on the other part. Drill a hole (about ") centered in each and put a dowel rod in there. The next time it is hit, it will just rotate and come right back or it will brake the dowel and that is easy to replace.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 21:45:00 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

I know people who had a Rubbermaid mailbox. Somehow it ended up in the freezer under the quarter cow and they didn't get to read their mail for 9 months. But it was still fresh.

Cool. For Xmas you could electrify this motion.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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the snow plow

anchored in the

out if it can

frozen solid.

top of the 7.

bolts through

it split

sticking out

the remaining

that I could

at least

weeks away.

oops- I just replied to the wrong post
you can put this on the stub:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdC415-1518-MB-122B&lpage=none
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Kathy wrote:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productIdC415-1518-MB-122B&lpage=none
Yikes, those Rubbermaid things are pricey. I was looking into buying a Rubbermaid Big Wheel Cart yesterday. The one I want is $450, while one that "will do" is $200. For a molded bit of plastic with a couple of wheels....
http://www.rcpworksmarter.com/rcp/products/detail.jsp?categoryIDP7&subcategoryIDT8&rcpNumV42-10
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