Post facto weaterization

We are looking at maybe as much as .75 inches of ice in the area and immediate temps with highs in the low 30s and lows in 23-26 range. Not really sure about what to do if the electricity goes out. If it goes out and looks like it wants to stay out for awhile, when should I be concerned about pipes, etc? Any suggestions for post facto weatherization or would just running a few faucets on drip take care of it at the temps suggested.
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There are some serious variables here- how much frost is in the ground? where are the pipes most exposed to the cold? how well is your house insulated? how much solar gain can you expect? is the sun shining?
I'm in a fairly well insulated house with a great southern exposure, good sized windows facing the sun, and no pipes on outside walls. If my power went off right now, and it was only getting down to the mid 20's at night, I wouldn't worry about pipes freezing for a week, at least. I'd probably get enough solar gain to keep the house from freezing for a month.
Your mileage *will* vary.
Jim
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Snow covered since before Christmas and some minus temps, so I am assuming a bunch.

Kitchen under sink is on a south facing wall. One of the upstairs bathrooms is on the outside wall. Maybe one other one.

To specs when it was made in the mid-80s. The roof matains snow, which I guess is a good indicators. Mainly blow in that covers the rafter in the attic. The blown in insulation filled most of the void between the front of the house and the walls on the inside. It was packed tight as we built it and looked at it. Don't know the r value right off.

Probably not all that much.

Probably not all that much.
Assuming the worst, any suggestions on doing things to lessen the likelihood of major problems. I have a gas furnace which really doesn't make all that much difference if the electricity goes out and I can't get the blowers to work.
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-snip-

A friend runs his furnace on an inverter and a deep cycle battery. Once a day he drags it out to his car, bolts it in and runs the car for a couple hours. He used it for 6 days a couple winters ago.
In my experience, the good thing about ice storms is that they aren't accompanied by really cold weather- and the high pressure that drove them in creates a few bright sunny days.
But if you have a setup for adding heat to the house with power to your furnace and/or backup heaters that need no electricity- you'll be prepared for the blizzard that brings below zero temps and high winds.
Jim
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I run my whole house, including 2 gas furnaces off one of those cheap 4kw generators. I think I paid around $450 for it. I see them used on craigs list for a few hundred all the time. Whip up a piece of 10/3 with a dryer plug on one end and a twist lock on the other and you can backfeed using the dryer outlet. Just don't forget to run off the main.
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Thats not very cold, at those temps my place would not freeze without heat for a week, at -20f I could have a problem in one night. Let it drip if needed
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On 1/31/2011 1:03 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

That's it.
City water does not freeze in pipes at 32, it has to super freeze. Nothing to nucleate around. Needs to get down to about 20 and stay there. Hot water usually freezes first because it goes through the tank.
You may wish to consider a couple of propane tanks and a catalytic heater.
Jeff
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