Portico kit?

I live in a neighborhood of mostly Colonials (all built in 1948). Most of them have this little roof thing-ee over the front door; I think it's called a "portico."
Is there some kind of kit for such things? I looked at HD and Lowes, and couldn't find anything. (At least not for the keyword "portico".)
Reason I want to get one, aside from the added convenience of rain protection when one is fumbling for one's key, is that the sun really heats up the front door. (Door faces W, or perhaps WSW.)
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snipped-for-privacy@jqpx37.cotse.net wrote:

Maybe a "Pergola"? (Pergolas are porches without the roof)
Free plans here: http://www.freeww.com/pergolas.html
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On Feb 25, 5:52 am, snipped-for-privacy@jqpx37.cotse.net wrote:

Built one from scratch last summer to replace one that carpenter ants had lunched on for several years. It isn't rocket science or furniture building but it takes some time. If you don't want anything quite as elaborate as Smitty suggested (Those are really pretty!) then take a photo of your house to an architect and have a simple set of plans made. You may need plans for permits in some communities, Porticos can be post supported at the outer corners, or for some house styles side braces are used. There are so many options that it may be why kits are rare. HTH
Joe
Joe
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Joe wrote:

On speaking terms with the neighbors? Pick the house that looks most like yours, and go measure up theirs. (Promise to change the gingerbread trim a little, of course, so it doesn't look like a copy.)
Unless you want an enclosed portico with a second door, it is basically just a small fancy porch roof. Hardest part will be tying it to the existing house and flashing the joint to the house wall. Is you place brick or siding? If brick, you will want flashing cut into a mortar joint. If siding, the flashing needs to go up under 1 course or more of siding. Don't think you need an architect (unless local permit rules require that, like in most of New England)- any residential designer could spec it out. Even if you DIY most of the work yourself, I'd hire the roof and the flashing out, especially if you go with a metal roof like many porticoes have.
An older boutique lumber yard is your best bet for finding the gingerbread trim- the Borg usually only has a small selection, if any. If you can find the faux lumber trim in the correct styles, it is worth the extra money. Frilly trim is a PITA to keep scraping and painting.
One last note- make sure your porch is sturdy enough to hold up a roof. If you need footers below where the columns go, that adds a layer of complications and expense. If you tie into house wall with actual load (and not just a couple lag bolts and the flashing on the roof), make sure there is something solid in the wall to tie to.
-- aem sends...
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