Portable regulated CO2 system at Lowes

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Lowes now sells a portable CO2 regulator for paintball tanks:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId6441-61735-J-6901-100
For $90 (plus a paintball tank you have to supply?) you get regulated CO2 on a 10-foot hose with quick-connect fitting. Meant for running air tools from your belt, but looks like it would work fine for beverage applications.
Anyone tried it or looked at it?
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

I've noticed it in passing, but not investigated very far. I did notice that they sold the tanks as well.
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you can get paintball tanks cheaper at WalMart.
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Yeah I saw these yesterday at Lowes. The "Rhino Power" tanks(9oz or 20oz) are by Blue Rhino, the same folks that do the propane tank exchanges. It looks like they are setting up the same system at Lowes where you return the tank for exchange. However it is so new that no one at customer service could manage to perform the proper incantation for the point of sale computer to divulge the actual cost, after the return credit, of the co2 cylinder. I figured I'd wait a couple weeks and go ask again.
Here is Blue Rhinos page http://www.bluerhino.com/rhinopower/index.html /
and an alternative to the Kobalt regulator. http://www.supplierpipeline.com/jacpac_mm.asp?products=y&workshop=y&jacmorr=y&jacpac=y
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

One other note: I'd be concerned about using CO2 in my air tools with the greater cooling effect than air, unknown effect on tool lubrication and potential for accidentally feeding liquid. The solution is easy however, just get air fills from a SCUBA shop instead of CO2. It's cheaper as well.
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Make sure they don't give you 3000 psi though!
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Newshound wrote:

I'd hope anyone at a SCUBA shop doing fills would understand tank ratings, particularly if they have purchased the adapters to do paintball tanks. Of course you could also get a SCUBA tank and regulator with the appropriate QC adapter and have a nice large regulated air source.
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wrote:

I'm just going to hire a SCUBA diver to through Pepsi at my paintball adversaries.
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Pete C. writes:

You can't get much compressed air in a paintball tank, compared to the expanded volume of CO2.
Depending on the delivery rate, the output CO2 gas should not be that cold. The tubing coil will warm it very effectively at low delivery rates. The tank is small enough that ambient heat will warm it directly.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Put a high speed cutoff wheel saw on it (or similar high consumption tool) on it and watch it freeze the regulator.
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Pete C. writes:

Yeah, but it isn't really expected to handle that. More for nail guns that are just using an occasional puff.
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Pete C. wrote:

That would be kind of dumb. As well as self limiting.
Read the instructions on the reg.
Misuse it at your own peril.
And wanna bet there is like to be a flow rate fuse or restrictor plate in the system to limit the CFM draw?
Cheers Trevor Jones
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But, it's next to useless. The amount of air you can store at CO2 pressures is very small. CO2 is stored as a liquid. The volume produced is way higher than air at the same pressure. Just like water produces way more volume in steam when you boil it.
Bob
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"Bob F" wrote: (clip)Just like water produces way more volume in steam when you boil it. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Hey, why not just fill the tank with water and throw it in a bonfire? Watt do you say to that? <G>
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The water might be hard on the tools. And they might get really hot. <G>
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Have we just invented the steam engine?
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Pete C. wrote:

And it comes at pressures much higher than a paintball CO2 tank is safe with.
CO2 at room temperature is in the 850 psi range, though it can get way higher on an overfilled tank.
Paintball High Pressure Air tankks (HPA) are a whole different kettle of fish, both in pressure capacity and price as well. Both are much higher than for CO2 tanks. HPA tanks will happily take a 4500 psi fill, if you bought the good ones. CO2 tank burst disks are rated at 3000 psi.
Filling a CO2 tank to it's rated pressure with air would get you about the same number of shots (nails, staples) as you would get from a CO2 fill without any liguid CO2. Not really worth the effort if you have to run to the fill station more times than you have to reload the nailer.
By the time the CO2 has travelled through the reg and hoses, (where the reg limits pressure to 100 psi or so) you can be pretty sure that liquid CO2 is not an issue. Hoses would blow if the liquid got that far. At least the ones between the reg and the tool, wher e you can bet they are not selling you a 3000 psi rated hose to feed a 100 psi rated nailer or stapler.
So. Air from the Scuba shop is about second in the list of bad ideas, right after using pure oxygen. :-)
Cheers Trevor Jones
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

There's actually a product made for beer that uses one of these from Williams brewing:
http://www.williamsbrewing.com/COMPACT_BEVERAGE_SYSTEM_P1796.cfm
This is more pricey by far, but includes a keg and other stuff. The regulator (which is basically the main thing you need other than a tank and assorted hoses) runs around $85.00. I couldn't see what the range was on the Lowes regulator -- beer is usually dispensed at around 12PSI.
Might even be cheaper to get a bev regulator and DIY your own adapter (assuming you need one) for a paintball tank, but I don't know.
I think the only other problem is that iirc paintball fills tend to be expensive for the amount of gas you get.
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Also the CO2 gas supply for drinks should not be industrial grade possibly with oil and other contaminants, the gas should be identified for drink dispensers and be oil free. I used to buy nitrogen for a film processing machine, it had to be laboratory grade certified as oil free.
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I was thinking about shooting an email to Blue Rhino and seeing if their CO2 is food grade or not.
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