Portable Generator - Electrical Hazard Protection

My daughter is a horse person and is very successful in endurance racing. She uses an excellent 3-stall horse trailer that has some sleeping space to transport to races. She has a shower in one of the stalls fed by a 50 gallon tank on top of the trailer. Gravity feed from this tank, however, does not provide enough flow for a shower or other uses so she would like to add a pump.
I have identified a 110v RV-intended pump that appears appropriate. She would power the pump with a generator that has typical 110v household type electrical outlets and adequate output.
I am concerned about shock hazard. The trailer is all-metal so she would be standing in an all metal stall while taking a shower. The trailer itself rests on rubber tires so is not connected to earth and the electrics are not grounded.
I am looking at extension cords that have a built-in GFI device that she would use to connect the generator to the trailer. But, do these work when there is no true ground? I am sure contruction workers using portable generators to power tools face a similar problem.
Any thoughts on dealing with potential shock hazard??
Eric
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In typed:

A GFCI should still work fine. They do NOT need or depend on an earth ground; only the Hot and Neutral wires. As long as the current in each stays the same, they're fine. If more than around 6 mA (not sure of the exact number) flows, they they very quickly trigger, turning off the power.
This URL should help. There are many more including from the man ufacturers themselves. http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infelectrical/infgfi.html
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On 4/7/2011 11:13 AM, RubEric wrote:

Why not just use an RV 12 volt pump off battery power?
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Tony Miklos wrote:

Or, in the alternative, an inverter?
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Many thanks to all of you for your replies. You have been very helpful.
But, one more question.
What should I do with the ground (green) wire? Should I connect it to the trailer? Or??
Thanks again.
Eric.
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wrote:

.What should I do with the ground (green) wire? Should I connect it to

Yes, connect the green wire to the trailer. That is both the generator and motor if they both have one. If the generator does not have a green wire, connect the frame of it to the frame of the trailer.
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You could use an inverter to convert the 12 vdc to 110 vac. I don't know if it will supply the amps you need, but here's one that plugs into the cigarette lighter outlet in the vehicle:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Paul
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There is no differance in the safety hazard of a generator and inverter that puts out the same voltage.
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Is there a shock hazard, the tires wont conduct to ground, the trailer hitch if its got a rubber plate under it may help make it safe, just a guess. 12v is safer than 120v. If you use a generator be sure it is grounded, I use a seperate rod , my unit has a grounding terminal because I have rubber tires and a rubber pad.
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On Thu, 07 Apr 2011 08:13:26 -0700, RubEric wrote:

There's an obvious centaur comment there, I think :-)

Not only for her, but I believe that horses are far more sensitive to (and at risk from) shocks than we are. I'd go with Tony's suggestion of a 12V pump and not have 120V anywhere near anything if it can be helped...
cheers
Jules
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Think, why dont you get shocked when lightning hits a car, insulation as in tires and seats is my thought.. A trailrer has only the Hitch as a week point, so fix it, insulate it, just my pennys worth of advise. but I think its worth alot more , Pay Pal accepted, Friendo
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trailer
1) make sure all metal pipes etc leading to the shower are well bonded to the trailer body. All metal objects leading into the shower must be bonded together. This will ensure no shock hazard can occur in the shower.
2) the other hazard is standing outside the trailer on the ground and touching the trailer. Connect the generator ground or case to a ground rod and also connect the trialer body to the the ground rod.
Mark
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