Portable drill

Page 1 of 2  
After years of thinking I can get along without one, I've decided to buy a portable drill. What should I look for? Volts, Amps or what? Sears has one going on sale for $70. The ad says it has 14.4 volts. It doesn't mention amp. I want one that I'll be satisfied with.
Any advice would be appreciated.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
After years of thinking I can get along without one, I've decided to buy a portable drill. What should I look for? Volts, Amps or what? Sears has one going on sale for $70. The ad says it has 14.4 volts. It doesn't mention amp. I want one that I'll be satisfied with.
Any advice would be appreciated.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Get a 12V one. I have a Makita and it can easily drive over 50 3" deck screws on a charge. Plenty of power and lighter than the higher voltage ones. After awhile the weight can get to you, especially if you are holding the drill overhead.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Lynch, 9/7/2006,4:35:38 PM, wrote:

I have a Ryobi 14.4 drill that came with two batteries, charger and a flashlight that was ~ $50. I am not a heavy user and it works great for me. My recommendation is to make sure you get two batteries. You don't want to wait for the other one two charge while you're building a deck or something. You may want to make sure it has the new battery type NiMh or something like that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 7 Sep 2006 16:48:58 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm,

I also have a Ryobi 14.4 and likee it. The old Skil 9.6v is still working for small drilling jobs, too, but the next one I buy is going to be a Bosch Impactor 14.4. They're extremely good for driving long deck screws in without even THINKING of stripping out the philips or square drive. Bosch is well made, lightweight, and shorter than most. It should fit where others wouldn't. I could pay $139 for the Ryobi impactor clone or about $200 for the Bosch kit. They'll be on sale next month when the Team Bosch show comes through town and I'll be on 'em like a hound in heat. <g> They usually have $40 off coupons and the kits go for $243.
Try one out. You'll never think of your old rotary-only drills in the same way again. Just don't let your wife try it. You'll end up needing two.
--
STOP LIVING LIKE VEAL
-----------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 07 Sep 2006 21:14:16 -0700, Larry Jaques

I think that no tool is optimally suited for every job. I have an older Ryobi 12V that I still really like. It's really well-balanced in the hand. The first set of batteries lasted about 4 years.
I also have a Ryobi 18V (I got it when it was about the same price as replacing the 12V batteries, then I found 12v batteries for much less, so now I have 2 cordless drills). I don't think these batteries last quite as long, and the drill is heavier, but it does have more power. The extra power is seldom necessary. I keep the 12v in the house and the 18v in the garage. Sometimes I use both (drill bit on one, phillips bit on the other)
For drilling through the walls and floors of my (brick) house I have a Makita corded hammer drill. I don't usually put the second handle on, which means that at some point I'll be posting here (typing with my left hand) that the second handle is necessary to prevent wrist injury. It's very powerful and the hammer feature really makes short work of drilling through masonry. But I don't like it for driving screws. It's designed to work at higher RPMs and I find the trigger too sensitive to get the lower speeds you want for driving screws.
I also have a couple of older corded drills, a Skil and B&D. I find these handy for really questionable work like wire-brushing and anything else that's likely to gum up, heat up or jam up the tool.
I think that if I had no drills at all, I'd buy a 14.4 volt cordless and the Makita Hammer Drill.

I had to read this twice before I "got" it. Or is my mind just in the gutter?
Greg Guarino
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 7 Sep 2006 16:35:38 -0400, "John Lynch"

Doesn't that sort of depend on what you need the drill for? I mean, Mine is a hand-powered bit-brace.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like everybody else, you will love it.

If you want cheap, you won't get the best features.
... a switch to lock out the clutch, so you don't have to rotate all the way around to the drill setting... if you don't also buy an impact driver, you'll be glad for that feature
... a single sleeve ratcheting chuck, not to be confused with the two-handed "keyless" garbage
... a choice of low/high or low/medium/high gears
... nickel metal hydride (NiMH) or lithium ion (Li-Ion) batteries instead of cheap/poisonous nickel cadmium (NiCad)
... two batteries, replacement batteries are expensive
... easily replaceable brushes
... light weight
Some swear by impact drivers for driving/removing screws.
If you can afford it and you don't need a very high powered drill, IMO Makita's duo (6935FDWDEX, impact driver plus drill) at Amazon.com looks awesome for $195 US after immediate $25 discount and free shipping.
If you can't afford both, you can get the drill for about $135 US after immediate $25 discount and free shipping. I think it includes all of the above mentioned features.
I have no loyalty whatsoever to Amazon.com or even Makita, and would encourage mention of other merchants and brands. But I do like those features, if I haven't missed any.
Good luck and have fun.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Lynch wrote:

Or if you want to try one and see how it works, Harbor Freight has an 18 volt one for $20. Extra battery for $10.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber440
I have a store about a mile away so often look at their stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rich:
There is one near me as well. Never bought anything there. I'm sure you've picked up winners and losers. How about naming a few of each?
I get the feeling HF purchases end up being either you got what you paid for or plain old lucky.
Al...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Al Bundy, 9/7/2006,11:22:33 PM, wrote:

I bought a reciprocating saw from Harbor Freight for $20. I've used it to cut branches from large bushes down and let the handyman I hired to replace my windowsills use it. After cutting one window sill out with it he claimed that was worth $20 right there. He also asked for my catalog.
If you use tools ocassionally or want to buy a specialty tool you'll use once or twice you can consider Harbor Freight tools. If you make your living with tools like this you want better quality and something that will last a long time.
Quality, Price, Service. Pick two. (I think that's how the adage goes).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
127.0.0.1 says...

I've had a Makita 9.6/12V for about 10 years. The batteries are going so I bought a 14.4V Porter Cable. Love it! The Makita rarely gets used anymore so I can save what's left of the batteries for the 3-5/8" cut-off saw and right angle drill that take the same battery.

The above drill is a *LOSER*. I bought a couple just to bang up. They weren't worth the shipping.
Winners: the 10" compound miter saw. One friend didn't like his so there may be a differing quality issue. Chip brushes, Nitrile gloves. $5 multi-meters.

There's a lot of that. ;-)
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might want to check your "yellow pages" and see if someone nearby repairs those old battery packs. They cut open the old pack and replace the cells and cement the package back together. I have never used the service but an In-law told me he was quite happy with the price and the results.
It would be a shame to have to junk some useful tools because the battery pack is getting long in the tooth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wonder what individual battery size those use (for example, 1/3 AA).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't know about that one, but I have looked inside a Black & Decker 6V drill. It contained 5 sub-C cells.
--
108 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@usenetlove.invalid says...

I've thought about that. Batteries are _expensive_ and rebuilding them is not quite so, but still...

I think they're "sub-C"; basically a half-length 'C'.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I suspect most things that cannot be comparison shopped for, like non-namebrand products. I guess that leaves you with an impression of the store itself to go by.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The quality there can be pretty low. However, in most cases like the drill you won't lose much. Good American Name :-) CHICAGO (Didn't know there was a Chicago China).
The drill is probably made by the same company of one marketed by an Auto Supply for about the same price. (Checker Auto = Parts America). They have one with the Coleman name:
http://tinyurl.com/e7n78
And they often have very good prices on refurbished name brands like Makita.
I have one of their Chicago angle grinders that I bought for $19 three or four years ago. I have worked it hard. One of the handiest tools I have. Got a nail that is hard to remove. Just grind it off.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I still like my 14.4 volt Bosch. The great part is the 1 hand chuck. It is powerful enough for most, even heavy duty, jogs and pretty light weight. When I lost it 2 years ago, I went right out an bought the current model. I only wish it had a level bubble.
Rich256 wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art Todesco wrote:

Of course you do. Just depends on how much he wants to pay and how much he will use it. (When it comes to cars I recommend Jaguar instead of a Chevrolet Aveo - if you can afford it).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.