Portable Air tank question

I just purchased a 10 gallon 135 max psi portable air tank at Sears, so that I can fill and store it, then have a handy source to fill tires and whatnot when I need to. Product webpage: http://tinyurl.com/6ys6u
Then I read the directions. It says "Always drain the tank of all air after the last use for the day & before repairing or removing any component parts." I imagine they're concerned about moisture which could probably condense in the tank as the air decompresses, but maybe it's just a concern that somebody could be hurt w/ the compressed air? It does warn to disperse any accumulated moisture by draining to 25 psi and then inverting it while draining the remaining pressure. .
Does anyone store air in these tanks for extended periods of time (apparently that is more than one day)? Will I be alright if I drain the tank every month or two and invert it so the moisture can come out? If I can't use it to store compressed air in the garage, I might as well return it.
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Compressing air heats the air molecules, and the water molecules and it carries the moisture into the air. It will condense in the piping to the point of use. Commercial systems have refrigerated dryers to remove the moisture.
Over time you may pick up a little, but probably not much. Certainly not enough for a single use to be of real concern. FWIW, I drain my compressor tank about twice a year and get but a few drops. I tis not in constant use like an industrial application.
Is the tank a good idea? Handy to take to a place with no other air. I'd be more concerned that it will keep the air and not leak out over time so when that tire is flat in the morning, you don't have what you need. A cheap compressor would be more useful for that. Portable tanks are good to fill up, then take it to the stranded car with the flat tire. Or to take up to the bedroom where you want to use an air nailer to tack up a molding.
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I agree with Edwin. I have a portable, but I can't depend on it. I think it has a leaky valve or something. I finally got a cheap compressor. A good investment. Still use the portable a little, like when I take a car to a DYI car wash to clean the engine... to blow the water out of places it shouldn't be.
Ed
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This is Turtle.
I see no problem with light use as to get water in the tank. Just anytime you re fill it check for water in it but it is rare to get much in them with light use. I have friend of mine that runs a tire place and he uses one everyday and he told me one time that he would get a ounce of water out of it every 6 month or so. Now he re fills it 1 to 4 times a day every day. We got to talking about this for he wanted to get some freon drums to use as air tanks and all freon tank now a days have a check valve in them and air will come out but will not go back in just for this reason to not let you use them for air tanks.
So about every 100 refillings check for water.
TURTLE
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Different equipment, different experiences I guess.
I have a cheapo Costco air compressor that maxes out at 135 psi or so. It has an oil-less compressor with a small tank. Every time I use it, I will get a few ounces of water in the tank. The manufactuer says this is normal and recommends opening the bleed valve at the bottom of the tank and running the compressor for a minute or so to blow out the water.
Supposedly, the tank is steel and water can cause rust and eventual failure.
Beachcomber
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This is Turtle
When your at the point of compressing the air. You get the water to drop out, but after you have compressed it and then moved to another vessel. The majority of the water does not move with it when filling a refill tank.
Also if you don't have a air drier on your compressor expect water to be in your tank all the time to rust it out. Draining it does very little good except to not get water in the tires your filling for it will be damp all the time in the fill or compressor tank.
TURTLE
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i would think the constant draining and refilling would ultimately put more water in the tank than what you propose to do with it..
randy

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Small air tanks will not hold air for extended periods in that price range, the valves are just not good enough. A small compressor is better.
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I have had the same 'air pig' for the last fifteen years. I have never drained it, not once. I have stored high pressure air in it for extended periods and it doesn't leak at all. Based on my experience, I wouldn't worry.

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I'd get a long hose before I'd get a portable air tank.
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Got one that will reach about 10 miles down the road to where the wife had a flat tire?
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My compressor is 8Gallon inexpensive. Would it make sense to keep my portable 10 gallon tank attached to the compressor when I am not using it portablyl so that I now have a combined 18 gallons of storage capacity?
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It will give you more initial capacity if you are suddenly using a lot of air, but once the pressure comes down, it will not increase any faster than the compressor can put it out for any tank. Then it will take longer to get back up to pressure.
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Makes sense to me. I've wondered if it would make sense to use an old 82 galon water heater. After all, the gas companies somtimes take out the electric ones when they put in gas. I've seen the "boneyards" out behind the gas places.
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Jim wrote:
I have a similar tank that I bought perhaps 15 years ago. It holds pressure indefinitely, and I've never found water in it. (Checked once about two years ago). Most of the atmospheric water vapor will be compressed out in the compressor's tank.
One thing to be concerned with is this: Don't fill it to its limit when it's very cold outside. Leave perhaps a 20 psi safety gap. Once it warms up, the pressure in that little tank will increase, just like anything else -- car tires, basketballs, etcetera.
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I'm probably going to die tomorrow. I've got three portable tanks (or maybe two, I think I traded one away) and have never drained any of them.
Yes, certainly it's an excellent idea.
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