Portable Air Conditioners - Hoses


Most portable ACs come with less than 5 foot hoses. Can additional lengths of hose be added with the same results? ------------ There are no atheists in foxholes or in Fenway Park in an extra inning game. ____
Cape Cod Bob
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Found on google search: Can the exhaust hose be extended? All the Portable AC's come with the standard hose length of 5-7 feet. If you need a longer hose, they are readily available at the local hardware store but it is a good idea to avoid hose lengths over 12 feet as well as 90 degree bends.
Can I extend the length of the exhaust hose? The manufacturers of the portable air conditioners generally recommend that the length of the hose should not be extended. If there is a backpressure or constriction to the airflow, the unit will not work and could also be damaged. If you are left with little choice, then make sure that while increasing the length of the hose, the diameter is also increased. Doing so will definitely decrease the efficiency of the air conditioning unit. However, read your warranty manual before doing so, as some manufactures do not allow it all.
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My personal experience. You could add anything you want. The thing still isn't going to cool for crap. Those things are way overstated, size-wise. The reality is that they lose all efficiency with the condensing section located within the conditioned space. You are better off, and way cheaper with a plain old window shaker, if you can possibly use one.
HTH, Lefty
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On 6/4/2010 2:52 AM, CapeCodBob wrote:

I have a Maytag portable air conditioner in an attic space that works OK with a longer hose. The one that came with it was a 4" in diameter. I bought a 6" to 4" aluminum reducer and inserted it into the back of the air conditioner, then attached 6" insulated tubing to help offset the loss of effectiveness from the longer tubing. The other end of the 6" tubing connects to a roof vent. It made an immediate improvement as the tubing does not radiate heat back into the attic space as it did with the stock tubing.
On hot days, the temp inside that space runs about 85 degrees. It used to run over 100. I can go into the attic and do stuff without breaking into an immediate sweat, as I used to do.
I bought eveything I used (except the air conditioner itself) at Lowes.
Jay
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On Fri, 04 Jun 2010 02:52:57 -0400, CapeCodBob

Thanks for the advice. I have a 1.5 HP dust collector system for my woodworking play area with multiple inlets. I guess I got dumb and didn't make the analogy.
Doh and thanks
------------ There are no atheists in foxholes or in Fenway Park in an extra inning game. ____
Cape Cod Bob
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