Porch light burns out very fast

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on 6/4/2007 10:41 PM Harry K said the following:

Ditto that. I've replaced almost all 60 watt incandescents in my house with 13 watt CFLs, including outdoor porch and deck lights. The only ones not changed were candelabra bulbs and those in dimmer lamps.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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There is now some availability of candelabra base models. I have seen these at some online lightbulb sellers in up to 60 watts claimed incandescent equivalence, and in Lowes at up to 40 watts claimed incandescent equivalence.
There are dimmable models - I just wish they were more widely available! There is a dimmable version of the 23 watt Philips SLS.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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on 6/6/2007 7:09 PM Don Klipstein said the following:

A lot of candelabra bulbs are the clear, decorative type used in chandeliers and hanging ceiling lamps. I'll have to pass on any CFLs for those at present, just for aesthetic reasons, because the bulbs are visible and part of the decorative feature of the lamps.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Could easily be the bulb you are putting in or a problem with the fixture. First, is the bulb in the fixture a base up configuration? If so, be sure the bulbs you are putting in are rated for that. Also, there is a product (might be a GE one) that is called "Post Lamp" that are rated for outdoor use. I've found they do last a lot longer in the lamp post then the standard incandescent bulbs.
YMMV.
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zmike6 wrote:

Two things tend to burn out lamps early, water and vibration. A leak somewhere will provide the water. You want to eliminate that. Vibration is also possible. Is that light near some sort of equipment that may vibrate, like the garage door? I suggest you may want to try a CF (compact florescent) or garage door lamp. Both tend to handle vibration better.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Regarding your using the term "burn out"...
I concur with the vibration part, but how does water cause a bulb to "burn out"?
I can see water corroding electrical connections and maybe those connections would cause localized heating at the base of the bulb which could even melt the soldered joint at the base tip and disconnect the bulb, but that won't make the filament "burn out" will it?
A better term to use have been "fail", not "burn out". <G>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Frankly I have wondered that myself.
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Joseph Meehan

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wrote:

I went through two floodlight bulbs (flagpole lights) before I realized that they were not 'burning out' it was the GFI breaker blowing when rain got into the socket. Now when the light is out, I check the GFI first.
Harry K
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One other possibility: What kind of bulbs you are using.
"Standard" 60 watt incandescents are typically rated to last 1,000 hours, and 12 hours a day that means average of 2.5-3 months, some more and some less.
There are longer life and industrial service and traffic signal versions of incandescents.
There are also garbage offbrand ones, such as some from dollar stores. I have seen some dollar store ones from sources who are so bad at having their act together as to claim the same light output in lumens from at least 3 different wattages! Given the performance I have seen from dollar store compact fluorescents (subpar to lousy to bad to outrageously bad in my experience), I have low faith in dollar store lightbulbs in general! Maybe better from Dollar Tree than from other dollar stores, since at Dollar Tree I have seen lack of "brands" that I have experienced as lousier and lack of (*cough-sputter*) dollar store compact fluorescents, but I still don't like the idea of a 100 watt incandescent producing less light than a "standard" 75 watt one with only moderately longer life expectancy than "standard".
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Try a 40 watt bulb, see what happens. I had the same problem with a kitchen light fixture. Call Home Depot and see what type of bulb they would recommend. I knew what I needed when I had a plumbing problem, saved a couple of $$$$$$ when I called in the plumber. Nancy
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