Porch light burns out very fast

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The outdoor light adjacent to my garage is burning out bulbs very fast. It worked fine using the original bulb for more than four years, then I noticed it would tend to go out sometimes (a light tap on the fixture would bring it back). Eventually the bulb burned out completely and I replaced it. The new bulb worked OK for about 6 months then began to exhibit the same behavior until it failed completely. So I replaced the bulb again and now it's dead after just 3 days. The fixture appears to be designed for typical 60w incandescent bulbs
If it matters, there is another outdoor light on the same circuit that does not suffer from rapid failure.
Does this sound like a short, loose wire, corrosion in the fixture? Is excessive voltage the main thing that can burn out a bulb prematurely?
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Loose wire in the fixture, or the socket itself is loose or corroded, not making good contact with the bulb.
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Sounds like a fault in the fixture. Just what I have no idea.
I cured the 'honey, the porch light is out" calls by replacing all yard/porch lights with compact flourescents. Changed from crawling a ladder every 3 or 4 months to a year or more. One fixture has a bulb that I have only replaced once in 10 years.
Harry K
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wrote:

Those compact fluorescents are going to be the next big environmental mess on the scale of MtBE!
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I hear that GE has an incandesent that is at least as efficient as a CFL... Anyone have any details?
As efficient as CFLs are, they are relatively complicated devices. There must be other solutions out there that doesn't involve such a complicated device for such a simple task.
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I have seen solar powered flood lights, but of course placement is sort of critical. When you think about it, the standard incandescent is actually very efficient compared to what was used previously. Much safer for the environment then previous as well.
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Noozer wrote:

The only thing on the scope that I know of are LED's and I suspect we will be seeing a lot of them in the next five years. CF's may well go down and be replaced with LED's.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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This is going to happen, and I like LEDs, but given the rate at which LEDs have been advancing in efficiency and overall cost-effectiveness I think it will be at least a decade before most home lighting is done with LEDs.
LEDs have had incremental advances, so far almost specialty by specialty for now. They work great in flashlights since they excel in lower wattage battery-powered applications, and they excel in traffic signals since incandescents are compromised in efficiency there by long-life design and color filters removing some of their light while LEDs normally prefer to specialize in producing colored light.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Noozer wrote:
...

I doubt that. But they do have a technology that is seems to be about 25% more efficient (for the same or better life). Unfortunately they deployed it in very few bulbs. The only ones that I knew of were PAR38 outdoor flood and T3 quartz halogen bulb to replace 300 watt (used only 225 and put out same light). Unfortunately, neither seems to be available anymore.
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Noozer wrote:

Kerosene lamp?
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The efficient GE incandescent has less than half the efficiency of a CFL. It is HIR, which is halogen with infrared retroflection technology. An example is a 350 watt tubular halogen with light output close to that of a 500 watt more-ordinary halogen, or close to that of about 150-170 watts of compact fluorescents. It improves upon other incandescents and halogens that have 1/3 or less the efficiency of CFLs.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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on 6/4/2007 11:39 PM Noozer said the following:

No one suggested building your own CFLs. It is not complicated to unscrew an incandescent bulb and replace it with a CFL. Just make sure you wear protective clothing, eye protection, gloves, ear plugs, and a gas mask. Be sure to evacuate the whole house before you replace the bulb in case it breaks, spreading the 4 mg of mercury throughout the house. Have the local hazardous waste removal service on standby. :-)
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I checked into that. What I read is that ultra-small but measurable amounts of mercury is contained in the CF bulbs. BUT, Coal-fired power plants which predominate in the U.S and Canada spew huge quantities of mercury into the atmospehere and is essentially everwhere in small quantities now. They say that the power saved by using those CF's would remove quanties of mercury from the enviroment that are far, far in excess of the ultra--small quantities of mercury in these CF's wich can be contained either with specific recycling or just in landiflls would be safe compared to the poisons these electric plants spew into the envronment.
I imagine it's all a moot point when the demand for electicithy is increasing around the world. Electricity is convenient and profitable and the human race will usually want it where available. I know I am totally addicted to electricity like most people I rely on it for many things. Keeping the cost of it down is good for business so it's hard to be against it. Hell, if it's in the fish then where else is it?
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Uh, mercury is a naturally occurring element. It already was/is everywhere before power plants started "spewing" it.
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Um, then maybe yu should have an extra portion. Where I live mercury contamination and poisoning are very real issues. If you are sarcastic concerning the danger then you deserve for you and you children to be poisoned. Then you will shut the fuck up.
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That's nice. (and THAT is sarcasm)
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A good portion of the fluorescent lighting in use today are the "green" bulbs, but they still are not mercury free, just lower mercury content.
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on 6/4/2007 11:08 PM Jackson said the following:

More than the many millions of office and industry fluorescent lamps that have been tossed out since they were invented?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Exactly, and whose to say that the cause of these supposedly high mercury levels are not the result of that? Many different types of waste were mishandled in disposal for many years.
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