Pool table recover

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Anyone done this? I've moved mine, and reinstalled rails and old cover. Doesn't seem that hard. Any suggestions on types of felt? New rails?
Steve
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I have had mine professionally recovered in the past. I am super anal about my table running 100% true and level. The best cloth on the market is Simonis http://www.simoniscloth.com/ They have different nap thickness so you can decide how fast you want your table to run. Good luck!

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Finman wrote:

Cool! I wonder if I could get a shirt or suit made out of it? *snicker*
TDD
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Steve B wrote:

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He means ask the management, not the pool players.
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mm wrote:

True!!
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It is not hard. You remove the rails, and then you can see how the felt is stapled to the table and the rails.
Once the felt is removed, vacuum up any loose material from the slate and inspect for any divots. You also want to check that the slate is level. Often tables are made with two pieces of slate and the seam is plastered with fix-all. If you have any divots or the seam is not dead flat and level, use fix-all to fill any divots or the seam. When dry use sandpaper with a long bock to knock down any proud area and vacuum.
Staple new felt pulling it tight and smooth, re-cover the bumper rails and reassemble.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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When I moved the pool table, it was quite a while until the room it went into was constructed. It laid on the floor for about four months. When I reassembled, it was remarkably easy, and the thing that made it was a long aluminum extrusion I had that was essentially a straight edge. I had three piece slate, and would not have recognized the dip had it not been for the extrusion. The stapling and pulling was remarkably easy, just learning to start in center and work out. If I can get Simonisi felt done for $100 install, I may just call a pro and not mess with it. They charge $300 here locally (maybe less now), but I don't know what type of felt they use. I want good felt, and Simonisi wants about $225 for their top wool felt. I think I can do this, but if it takes two days, I'd just as soon spend the Franklin.
Steve
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When I was a kid I would hang out at the pool hall and assisted in several of these projects. If I recall it was only a couple of hours, but they had done this a few times.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Mon, 7 Dec 2009 10:54:57 -0800, "Steve B"

I did it once years ago on a used table I bought cheap because the cover was trashed. It is not really that hard to do but the cover material is pretty expensive. You need to get it at a pool table supply place. These days that is probably on the internet.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'd guess I've recovered 75 to 100. How to do it depends on the table. Lot's of different factors. In general the tables made for home use can be the hardest to cover. Antique ones are fairly easy. Coin operated ones are the easiest for me since that is mostly what I recovered. Back when you could by good cloth I could do the side pocket rails with no fold. These days the cloth has too much synthetic blend and doesn't stretch like it used to. Take a close look at the ends of the rails on the side pockets, most likely folded. Maybe the very thin cloth still stretches? I don't know. Thin cloth will give you great action and wear out fast, heavy cloth is the opposite.
On some of the cheapest tables, if you take time, you can make the 3 piece slate near perfect using shims, make the shims out of cereal box type cardboard. And I've seen brand new "Valley" brand coin operated tables come from the factory with the supports not all on the same plane. Put it together and the one piece slate bends (yes slate does bend, and one piece slate is normal for coin-op tables) MFers knew the table was bad at the factory, things were out of place so bad that they had to grind the rail bolts to a point in order to get them started.
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Some of the cloth that is used for commercial purposes have a backing on it and doesn't stretch very well for the rails. That backing has to be peeled off for the rails to be done correctly, but not the bed.
Hank
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

Yes I've heard that and I think I pulled some backed cloth off a couple slates, but I've never used the backed stuff on the slate or rails. Ever hear of "House" brand felt? That was once supposed to be the good stuff, but we were doing coin op tables where the thicker the cloth the longer it lasted meant more profit. Anyway I heard quite a few times that "house" pool table cloth was a sideline. There main product was the felt pads that piano hammers rest on. I've no idea if it was true.
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Never heard of that.
People do funny things to pool tables. They have gone to the extent of shimming the pockets. That is where a thin piece of rubber (1/16") is glued to the inside of the rubber rails at the pocket to make the pocket smaller. Then this is where they practice. They feel a "tighter" pocket will help with their aim. In pool halls that charge by the hour, this will increase the play time.
I also heard, but not verified, that on the coin-ops, the slate is shimmed slightly high in the middle so that balls will go easier, therefore faster game time. Also, the pockets are wider. Again, faster games and makes the shooter look good.
In reality, every table plays different. No table is perfectly level. And many times it doesn't matter anyway. A good player can adapt quickly and play on almost anything.
Hank <~~~has been on both sides of the hustles
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In reality, every table plays different. No table is perfectly level. And many times it doesn't matter anyway. A good player can adapt quickly and play on almost anything.
Hank <~~~has been on both sides of the hustles
Ayup. Adjusting shooting to a new table takes about one game.
Steve
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

I've seen the inside of many coin op tables and I think if it's true, it was the operator who did the "modifications". I did know one guy who would slightly increase the speed of a jukebox turntable so there was more time to put in more money.

No, none are perfect but I must say that I got them almost as level as they could be. Better than 95% of other coin op tables. After using a level I then shot a ball off bumpers, or just real slow, watching which direction it drifted as it slowed and made fine adjustments. And it was nothing to pull the one piece slate more than once (by myself) to shim where needed if it couldn't be fixed by adjusting the leg levelers.
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Those one piece slates are HEAVY. I've done a few. They are still much easier to recover than the 3 piece, but MUCH more work to move if you remove the slate to move. Most companies around here just remove the legs and keep everything else together when moving. Gotta be strong!
I drop a ball from about a foot so that it contacts the edge of the rail and is sent down the table at a slow to medium speed. Shooting a ball with a cue to determine its path can vary because ofr the slight side spin that you may apply without knowing it. They also make a gizmo that is like a wedge with a groove in it. You lay it on the table and roll a ball down it. The speed wil always be the same and no side spin affect takes place.
But, nothing is perfect. Some cloths have little balls of cotton that will throw a ball off too. Depth of knap and temp/humidity will also affect roll and speed. There is just soooooooooo much that can affect ball roll that it is impossible to get it right. Not counting how a person strokes to begin with.
Hank
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Well, if you've got any kind of stroke you can lag a ball across the centers of the spots. If it crosses the spots on the return you've got a pretty good table, and a fairly decent stroke.
I like to put the corner of a chalk on the rail at one diamond and shoot a lag with the ball aligned so that the cue aligns with the opposing diamond and the ball center.
As in golf, opponents play the identical course layout. -----
- gpsman
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snip
morphed again, you slimy little puke?
plonk
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I used to own bars in Houston. The pool tables are sat on a LOT more than any home table unless you have rowdy disrespective relatives and inlaws. You don't tell a big cowboy or construction worker to get his ass off the table. You can ask, but most times, it's just as good to ignore it. The pool tables are sometimes used after hours for things I won't say. Lots of things that can get them out of level. I don't recall our supplier ever leveling it after the install. There were screw feet so we could do it if it was really bad, which we did occasionally. Never ever tightened the rails, tho. Told them if they were loose and they did it.
Irving Kaye was the brand. Nice looking tables, don't know if they were any good or not. Well, they were good for porking cocktail wiatresses. The Dixie mafia supplied them, as well as all the other machines and cigs in the places. And the tables, chairs, beer boxes, booze, juke box, beer, and a caveat that "If anyone comes in here and tries to pressure you to buy from them, just call me and I'll take care of them." The man was pure d mafioso with two HUGE bubbas with him at the original interview, one stood at the table, the other by the door. Neither ever spoke, just stood there with their arms closed. We got everything to furnish the place for $2,000 down payment, the rest to be taken in payments. Another caveat, "If you make it or if you fail, you WILL pay me. Understood?"
We made real good money, and they emptied the machines every week, giving us a healthy fund for the bartender to keep the juke box going, refund any problems on the table or machines, a separate cut, and then a cut we put down on the IRS envelope. We ended up opening and selling six of them in Houston and Galveston. I lived very well during those seven years, and even had the foresight to buy silver before it went sky high. Then got a healthy monthly check for two years after the corporation dissolved due to my partner's death. (natural)
Steve
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