Pool Pump plumbing and Electrial question:

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On 5/11/2013 9:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yup. A few others in this thread have suggested focusing on the pump. if removing one elbow is not going to make much impact on flow. To be honest I suspected this but wanted to hear from others...
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On Sat, 11 May 2013 06:42:54 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yikes!
I have no idea 'what' radius I bought from Home Depot.
Is this a long or short radius?

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That is definitely a short radius bend. Should only be used when physical constraints necessitate it. (ie restricted space)
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On Sat, 11 May 2013 11:13:46 -0700, harry wrote:

Drat. I never knew there was a distinction! Until now. :(
I also didn't know enough to even think to ask about a distinction.
In hindsight, I would have used long-radius elbows had I known of their very existence, especially since I had tons of room:

It seems, upon looking just now at my original professionally installed plumbing, that there were no long-radius elbows used:

That's odd, because there was plenty of room, so, I wonder why the builders opted for short-radius elbows instead of the more efficient longer-radius elbows (which can't possibly have cost all that much more, can they?).
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wrote:

From my experience most pool installers are ambivalent about pool hydraulics and if they end up having to much head, they just use a bigger pump or tell you to run it longer. They just go for a compact jumble of pipes that looks pretty. There were several good web sites that had hydraulic calculators when I was building my pool. (google pool hydraulics) I ended up using 3" pipe with sweeps for the curves on the long trunk runs, necking down to 2", then 1.5" at each return and minimized the number of elbows in the "pack" area. I used 45s to get into the ground and back out, That saves you the "price" of less than half of the head calc vs a pair of 90s. The end result was I could turn over a 15,000 gallon pool with 1hp less than 5 hours. I get the spa turned over for free. I spent another $50 on the bigger pipe but I got that back in electrical savings pretty fast and my pump cruises at 4-5 PSI with a clean filter.
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Short
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.

y

Most of what that article says is either wrong or irrelevant
"The main reason for running the pool pump during the daylight hours is to ensure proper sanitation. Chlorine is degraded by sunlight, so there is a larger demand on the chlorine residual during the day."
Yes, some of the chlorine is going to be degraded by sunlight, but so what? I've had my pool sit all day without circulating, checked the chlorine level and there isn't a measurable difference. It's still at a perfectly acceptable range, the same at 5PM as it was at 8AM. That's what stabilizer is for.
"When the pool pump is operating, the circulation in the pool disperses the chlorine throughout the pool."
That's true, but dispersing it at night works about the same. And once dispersed, it doesn't just change dramatically in 12 hours.
"Also, most pools use some type of chlorinator that adds chlorine only when the pump is running."
I think that is flat out BS.
"By running the pump during the day, it helps keep the chlorine at a constant level."
I agree in theory, it would keep it more constant during the day. But I say it's plenty constant enough with the pump off during the day. Absent a problem, who cares.
"Use of the pool also consumes the chlorine, and most swim during the day."
Again this apparently assumes you have an inline chlorinator.
"Having the proper levels of chlorine helps kill algae spores, germs, bacteria and other contaminants as soon as they enter the pool. If the chlorine level is too low, or not dispersed evenly throughout the pool, it gives these "intruders" the possibility of gaining a toe-hold and starting to grow. This can result in cloudy water, algae blooms and even recreational water illnesses that can be transmitted between bathers."
Proper level of chlorine and filtering at night are not mutually exclusive.
"Many pool owners are starting to install alternative methods of chlorination and sanitation on their pools. These include salt chlorination and ozone. The same rules apply to these as with conventional chlorination."
Which also appears to be irrelevant.
"The only way to make sure your pool is safe for bathers is using a good quality test kit to make sure the water is properly sanitized, says Steve Bludsworth, owner of All-Pool Service & Supply in Orlando."
That's about the only thing here I agree with.
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y

oss?

e

ve you

Bob F covers all the important points....
A 2 speed pump will save way more money than an elbow replacement....
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