Pool Heaters:

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On Aug 16, 1:03 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Which raises another possibility, ie a heat pump based pool heater. I've never seen one around here. But depending on electricity costs in Canada, pool size, etc it might be an option.
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I have a 330K BTUH heater here in Florida and I think it is a huge waste of money. It feels like I am just burning dollar bills to keep the pool warm. We seldom ever turn it on. I do have solars and they work pretty well if you keep the pool covered but I hate the cover too. Usually we are resigned that the pool is going to be too cold to use for 3-4 months a year. I switch the solars over to the spa and it is toasty all winter for free.
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On 8/15/2012 4:12 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

All right, here's my 2 cents. Been doing this for 15 years, not pool heaters exclusively, but installation, maintenance and repair of propane appliances. Look at Sta-Rite heaters. They aren't as large as other brands (BTU vs BTU), are power vented, and can be vented out a side wall if installed inside. The biggest issue is lack of care in the fall as critters will find a way inside and wreak havoc with insulation and wiring. I suggest to customers that they wrap the heater as tightly as possible and spread some moth balls or other rodent repellant to minimize invasion. As far as heating goes, about one and a half degrees per hour is average. A solar cover will help maintain the temp and you will use less energy maintaining the temperature than letting the temp drop and trying to reheat.
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On Aug 16, 6:23 am, Tom Lachance

In my world there is no science that supports that it takes less energy to heat a pool continously as opposed to letting the temp drop and then reheating. It's just like setting back the temp in a house. Unless you have different energy sources at different times or different energy rates, you're always going to save money by letting the temp drop, then reheating.
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2012 08:08:57 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

But think of the solar cover as insulation. They really do help. In NY, I could regulate the temperature within about a +/- 4 degree window using the pump (night or day) and the solar cover. I liked the water about 78-80F unless it was above 90F and then maybe up to 82-84F.
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to reheat. <<<<<<
This statement is incorrect.
If it were true why would setback thermostats be made?
Thought experiment:
If I left the pool heater on for two weeks while I was gone on vacation, I'd use less energy than if I turned it off for two weeks and reheated upon return?
Not likely.
cheers Bob
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*I have a few customers with pool heaters and most of the time they don't use them except for parties due to operating costs. I have heard that painting the bottom of the pool black will help boost the temperature slightly. One customer has an array of solar water heater panels (More like mats) on the lawn next to the pool, but I don't know how well it works. As with anything that is heated, including your house, you need to minimize the heat loss to keep the expense down. You already have a cover to help with this. All of the gas heaters that I have seen are outdoors near the pool pump.
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It's rare to see them used here in NJ too. A lot of people have them, but very few use them due to the cost. OP says there is no room on the roof for solar. Another option would be to install them on an angled wood frame. But that only works if you have good south or west exposure, room, can hide it somewhat, etc.
There is yet another option. It would not be my first choice, but there is a company that sells a solar heater that goes in the ATTIC. It's basicly a heat exchanger with a powerful fan that the pool water gets pumped through. With a 32F delta between the pool water temp and the attic air it delivers 60K BTUs. So, if the attic is 107F, and the pool is 75F, you're getting 60K BTU for free. Whether it can work depends on how big the attic is, how hot the attic gets, where the attic is versus the pool, size of the pool and if it's covered.
Google solar attic pool heater if interested.
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2012 06:24:30 -0400, "John Grabowski"

A friend just installed a "lap pool" with about half of the pool only about 6 inches deep, with black granite tile on the bottom. The pump moves the water over the black shallow into the main pool - heating the pool quite effectively.
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