Pool: asset or liability at resale?

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I'm at a point of deciding whether to replaster my pool or demolish it. My question for the group is: If you were a homebuyer right now, would a pool in good condition be a plus or minus in your decision to buy?
(sorry if this is the wrong group for this question, but I've seen similar questions answered here)
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Depends on the buyer. I can't afford to maintain a pool, so I told my realtor to avoid homes with pools. For someone else....who knows?
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Most would say, negative.
Dave

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Depends on the Buyer.
I recently bought my first home. One of my criteria was that the house has NO POOL. I don;t want to deal with the upkeep and repairs of a pool. My wife doesn't swim. However, If there were a hot tub, it would have been very acceptable. Sq. Ft. was more important to us than anything..............Needed the room.
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Where do you live is the pool the whole back yard or is it just part of a huge backyard? Do other homes in your neighborhood?
Are you in Phoenix or Des Moines?
Wayne

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I would never have another pool. It is a monster sitting in the backyard demanding attention and expensive chemicals.
Entropy wrote:

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We specifically told our real estate agent not to show us any homes with pools. We told him that we would consider a home with an above ground pool if it was one that could easily be removed (no deck attached to the house built around the pool, for example).
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Might depend where you are located.
I'm in Hawaii and didn't want a pool but bought a house with a poll and now use it daily. It's at the bottom of a hill and does not dominate the yard.
Might cost you as much to properly demolish as to replaster. Or let the new buyer replaster.
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Entropy wrote:

Most realtors say negatively. Tony
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I'd have to disagree. I've seen lots of surveys, which you can probably find with a web search, that show how much value is added to a home for various improvements. Things like adding a bathroom or remodeling the kitchen are always at the top. Some even add more resale value than they cost. Pools are near the bottom of the list, however I have never seen them detract value, they just add a lot less than they cost.
A lot also depends on where you are located. A pool is going to be a lot more desirable in FL than it is in MA. Are there many pools in your neighboorhood?
I think the main reason realtors dislike pools is that a home with one can take longer to sell. If people have small children, for example, or are elderly they may be unwilling to buy a home with a pool, so it rules out some buyers. On the other hand, if someone really wants a house with a pool, they may still buy a home without it, figuring they can add it. The realtor would just rather have it sell quickly to as many people as possible.
I would also evaluate what the total cost of fixing up the pool vs filling it in and relandscaping, etc., will be, how attractive the area the pool is in, etc before I made a decision.
As for my vote, if the house had an attractive pool in good shape in an area where it can be used enough, it would be a plus for me as a buyer.
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Chet Hayes wrote:

http://houseandhome.msn.com/improve/whichimprovementspayback.aspx
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When we were shopping for houses we saw a few with pools, and most of the pools were in need of some work.
Keep in mind that I've never owned a pool before, but I'm pretty handy and I think I could have had all the pools I saw up and running within a month or two.
In my case, if I had made offers on any of these homes I would have used pool repair costs to haggle the price down.
That said, my suggestions are to list at close to the price you want to sell for, stating the condition of the pool, but stay pretty firm on your price. Or you could ask a high price and assume that people will really want to haggle it down because of the pool.
FYI, we didn't buy a house with a pool because we found one with something more useful and just as controversial. A pole barn.
Christopher
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Most realtors *where*?
Jeff
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wrote:

If you're suggesting that climate might in some way be related to peoples' desire to have pools, I must warn you that introducing logic and facts to a newsgroup discussion can be dangerous and frustrating.
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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 02:14:20 GMT, "Entropy"

Well, if the neighborhood was overrun with some mouthy little pukes, I'd consider having one installed and nightly removing the "Victims" while everyone else slept. :)
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wrote:

You just won a 12 pack of virtual beer and some virtual chips. I'd love to know how you dead with dogs and their owners! :-)
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Depends on where you live...I live in SW Fla and pools here are a positive for those from "up North" who migrate down here on what seems to be an hourly basis. It is also a plus for me since I enjoy swimming and use it daily. I guess if I lived in place like Pennsylvania, Missouri, or even South Carolina or Northern Georgia, a pool might not be the attraction it is in year-round hot weather climates.
As for the monthly maintenance, once the pool is properly balanced, all you do is maintain the proper free chlorine-acid balance with either a constant load of 3-inch chlorine tabs (cost ranges from $40 to $60 for a bucket that can last several months) in your chlorinator or by shocking the pool with a few gallons of liquid chlorine (about $2.50 per gallon) every few weeks. The total cost shouldn't exceed $30-$50 per month, if even that much.
Problem comes in when the pool owner neglects the maintenance and the water starts to turn green and show algae growth along the sides. That's when maintenance becomes expensive since the owner usually freaks out and calls a pool maintenance business for help. However, it's actually quite simple to turn a dirty pool around in basically 36 to 48 hrs, going from a leaf-laden, can't-see-the-bottom green/brown pool to a clear blue one by simple cleaning and shocking.
Following Hurricane Charley I ended up with one of those pools that looked like it had been abandoned by the owner, full of leaves and pine needles blown thru breaks and tears in the pool cage's screen fabric, lots of yellow and green algae build up since our electric was out for 12 days and couldn't run the pump. When the power came back, I poured 4 gallons of liquid chlorine to shock it (cost about $10), turned on the pump for 24 hours, skimmed off the debris with my leaf basket and pool vacuum, and added an algae remover I had stored, resulting in a crystal clear blue pool again just 36 hours later.
Entropy wrote:

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wrote:

I couldn't agree more with your statements. This is exactly my experience here in Arizona. If you keep up with the maintenance it is VERY easy and cheap to maintain the pool. Just making sure the chlorine and PH is good and empty the filters on a regular basis is the only things you need to do. If you ignore the pool you need expensive shock treatments (for some algea kind). I buy the 40 pound buckets of 3 inch tablets and I buy the 40 pound buckets of granular chlorine. They last a LONG time. I probably only need one bucket of 3" tablets a year, and the granular chlorine lasts much longer than that. Once in a while I buy acid to keep the ph good. Overall I probably spend less than 20 bucks a month on chemicals. In winter it needs almost NO chemicals (non heated pool)
If I hear people complain about maintenance it is almost always because they constantly neglect the chemicals and need a pro to come out or buy expensive algea chemicals. I've had a pool for 6 years and have not had algea ONCE.
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reluctant volunteer when I purchased my home. My family loved the house and the pool that came with it. I didn't having grown up taking care of one. However, pool maintenance is a lot easier now days. The automatic pool vacuums are easy to install and make pool maintenance a no brainer. I occaisionally brush and have to watch the water balance, which isn't that difficult.
Your experience with the algae control shows the chlorine is the best algaecide available.
My only caveate to pools is to make sure they are in good shape when you purchase them. A pool remodel is pretty costly, especially when you factor in upgrading pumps, filters and electrical.
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Having had a pool in the yard in the past, I'd not want a pool if I am in the market. An in gorund is definitely out of the consideration. I think most realtors would tell you the same.
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