Polybutylene plumbing


I have shutoff valves that are now heavily corroded and do not fully shut-off. My home was built in '92. While researching how to remove the "crimped" on valves, I found several older posts about polybutylene (Quest) and how it's no longer used and in many cases not up to code (for interior use).
I'm hesitant now to mess with these valves. It's seems the time period has expired for the class action lawsuit. Is there any recent information on this? From what I've read, it's not a matter of if there will be a problem, but when.
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I have shutoff valves that are now heavily corroded and do not fully shut-off. My home was built in '92. While researching how to remove the "crimped" on valves, I found several older posts about polybutylene (Quest) and how it's no longer used and in many cases not up to code (for interior use).
I'm hesitant now to mess with these valves. It's seems the time period has expired for the class action lawsuit. Is there any recent information on this? From what I've read, it's not a matter of if there will be a problem, but when.
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Google is your friend. Type in polybutylelene plumbing and follow the prompts.
Joe
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http://lmgtfy.com/?q=polybutylene
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Before anyone else suggests GOOGLE, I have done that ("From what I've read..."). I'm looking for CURRENT information. All I'm finding so far is outdated information.
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Tomas wrote:

If you live in hot climate in South, the risk is higher. That is my understanding.
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The poly plumbing isnt really a problem if it was built in the '90s. Installation problems abounded though as it was easy to kink and stress on Ts and elbows will cause them to leak eventually. Poly will work with Sharkbite connectors and these will allow easy connections to be made to Copper, CPVC and PEX. Sharkbite also has connectors that will adapt it to threaded pipe. I have polybutylene plumbing and recently remodeled a 22 year old bathroom. Although I replaced all the poly while I had access to it inspection of the poly showed it to be good aa new. Yes Im on city water with chlorine, lots of chlorine.
Poly does have a bad reputation even though it is still used in just about every other country except the USA. This may be an issue if you are trying to sell ..
Jimmie
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I live in central FL. From my readings, quite a few FL homes (probably greater than 50%) have PB. I contacted a local real estate agent and she's never heard of it so it may not be as big a deal as I've read. My insurance company did not mention anything although I'm told this does not have to be disclosed when selling so if I didn't know, how can I tell them. The valve is not plastic but copper and "pushed" into the PB sleeve and then clamped with a copper ring. I'd like to remove the clamp (Dremel?) and insert a completely new valve. These valves are likely 17 years old. I'm not sure I can get the copper clamp from Home Depot or Lowes. I may need to find a local plumbing supply store.
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Tomas wrote:

My house is built in '94 in Calgary Alberta. Locally it is a non-issue. My plumber told me once if PB material is exposed to hot temp. of >90 deg. C(122 deg. F) it'll become a concern. 5th wheel trailer I had had PB plumbing. Never had any trouble while I had it for about 20 years.
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122FPC 90C4F
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Best regards
Han
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No problem, just cut the pipe and reconnect to your favorite valve of choice using Sharkbite adapters. This is really easy. You just push the pipe into the Sharkbite. The only problem yu may have is if there is not enough slack in the poly pipe. You will have to figure ou a way to extend it. I did this by screwing a couple of brass nipples into the valve and connecting the SB adapters to the nipples. Screw up, no problem, the SBs disconnect as easily as they connect. I know I sound like I have stock in the company but these things work really well even if they are a little pricey.
Jimmie
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Jimmie, do you connect the "sharkbite" connector directly to the PB or do you insert a copper tube into the PB and then connect to that?
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I see that you can do either. I also found some BrassCraft PushConnect valves. They appear to work on the same principle as the Sharkbite but already have the valve integrated.
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Sharkbite has those too but big box stores may not carry them. I think Watts makes a plastic version, never tried them.
Jimmie
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The PB just plugs into the sharkbite. Push and twist. My wife backed into my workbench with her car which hit the wall where the distribution "tree" was located. She cracked about 3 fittings. I replace all the PB fitting with Sharkbites even the ones she didnt damage. End of pipe should be cut square, no nicks, burrs, gashes or dirt that would prevent a good seal. Sharbites were about $5 USD each and I replaced 6 or seven fittings and a couple of pieces of pipe all less than $50. From past experience this would have cost me $300 if I had to call in a plumber. I did buy a tool for cutting plastic pipe for about $10. This made for a nice square cut which I have been since told is really not that imporant.
You will be amazed how easy they are to use. Make sure you get the disconnect tool(very inexpensive) so you can take them apart. I practice a couple of times making connections and taking them apart before getting started.. That should take 10 minutes. to get the hang of. I lost my disconnect tool so I made one out of a piece of aluminum scrap. This was much easier than going back to the store for one.
Oh yes they are reusable after you have to take a connection apart.
Check out the Sharkbite website, they have a lot of good info but they do not tell you it will work with PB.
I think mine came with some brass tubes that you push up insde the pipe to make the pipe end more rigid.
Jimmie
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Tomas wrote:

My entire house had to be replumbed because of PB pipe. It was built in 1987. You need to get a professional opinion. If yours is failing, it's just a matter of time until you could have some serious water damage from ruptured pipes or fittings.
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High Tomas. I've been in the polybutylene replacement business for quite some time and you're correct the major class action settlement is no longer accepting claims for relief. That said I'd encourage you to contact them yourself just to make sure there are no exceptions that may apply to your particular situation. Have a look at www.pbpipe.com and www.spencerclass.com. Please let me know if you have any further questions and I wish you the very best of luck. As to the usage of your valves I'd agree that using them is quite risky so try to use them as little as possible.
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