Poison Ivy Removal Without Harmful Chemicals?

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Can Poison Ivy be killed without harmful chemicals like Roundup? Is there a safer chemical to use?
-- Bertie Brink Life is a sexually transmitted disease. R. D. Laing http://www.setdefault.com/ : http://www.csmonitor.com /
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Bertie Brink wrote:

Um. So, you want to kill thing A with thing B, but you don't want thing B to be "harmful"? I think you'd better rephrase your question.... did you mean: harmful to my lawn / flowers ? harmful to nearby trees and bushes? harmful to fish in a nearby stream? harmful to yourself / family / children ?
As far as environmental concerns, it is my (not very informed) understanding that Roundup is among the less environmentally damaging chemicals, because it breaks down fairly quickly. I could be wrong... and there are always other ways to kill poison ivy.
-Kevin
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Bertie Brink wrote:

...
Not easily if there's anything more than just an isolated plant or two--it roots very deeply and isn't much fazed by any mechanical operation.
Roundup isn't all _that_ hazardous w/ simple attention to proper preparation and application (unless you're meaning vegetation, not you). It is, of course, non-selective and will take out almost anything you get it on so if that's the problem, there are safer chemicals in that sense--tryclopor (Ortho Brush-B-Gone) or a mixture of 2,4-D and tryclopor (Crossbow is one trade name) are broadleaf-selective herbicide that are effective on woody plants. Poison ivy is tough to kill so may take several treatments particularly if have heavy infestation and live in an area w/ adequate moisture.
Small infestations can be handled by cutting the vine and painting the woody stems w/ Roundup, but that's tough for more than just a few plants. Some claim you can cut it down and smother it w/ plastic or similar--I suppose it might be possible but sounds like far more work than it would be worth to me.
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Bertie Brink wrote:

Round Up isn't all that terrible on the "environment." You can keep it localized by using two gloves: rubber dish gloves to keep the Round Up off your skin and cheap cotton glove over the rubber gloves. The latter acts as a sponge -- you dip your fingers into the Round Up, hold a specific plant and wipe it with the liquid.
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You can put on gloves and pull it out.
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m Ransley wrote:

tried all the mechanical means and all i got was itchy and actually really ill after steroids
i am highly allergic
DONT EVEN THINK OF BURNING POISION IVY IT WILL GIVE YOU LUNG TROUBLES and can be life threatening
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And the roots break off and restart.
PI removal by mechanical means is very difficult.
A professional botanist once said that the very most effective and still safe method is to make up a roundup solution of the appropriate strength, add a few drops of dishwashing soap. Then, put on rubber gloves with a cotton gloves overtop (as per the previous poster). Then dip the gloves in the solution and run the plant thru your hand.
Pinpoint control of application, and it nukes the roots.
She's had to deal with poison ivy where the stems were up to the thickness of her wrist (thank heavens it doesn't get that big up here!), and I think she knows what she's talking about.
Glysophate (roundup active ingredient) is one of the most thoroughly tested chemicals ever, and it's considered completely non-toxic to anything but plants. The additives that commerical suppliers add may not be quite that non-toxic, but they're certainly not the hazard that one might expect.
You should have seen what roundup replaced - anhydrous ammonia and similar _nasties_ that ordinary citizens weren't allowed to use.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Chris Lewis wrote: ...

I don't know where you got the idea that anhydros ammonia was widely used as a herbicide--it is (as in still widely used) a source of N as a fertilizer and certainly Roundup (and generics) are definitely _not_ a replacement for anhydrous.
As for other restricted herbicides, there are a few that have been removed, but not nearly as many herbicides as insecticides. The prime reason for glyphosphate becoming so popular is cost and the ability to have bred tolerant crops--hence, "Roundup ready" soybeans, for example.
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I thought it was used as a soil sterilizer in addition to the N source.
Formaldehyde is (was?) also used as a soil sterilizer.
Paraquat is another nasty, and is still in use.

And virtually zero wait time before replanting. I seem to recall that the replant time for most other non-specifics is on the order of weeks or longer.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

The story I heard was that roundup was originally a rust/corrosion preventative. They used to spray it on metal bridges and they noticed the vegetation in the spray area was dying. So they repackaged it as a herbicide and their sales skyrocketed.
Bob
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Bob wrote: ...

...
No idea where you must have heard that, either, but you might have checked the Monsanto site for some background info before passing it on...
http://www.monsanto.com/monsanto/content/products/productivity/roundup/back_history.pdf
http://www.mindfully.org/Pesticide/Monsanto-Roundup-MSDS25jan01.htm
The latter is the MSDS which includes the following--
"Storage ... Incompatible materials for storage: galvanized steel, unlined mild steel, ..."
Not exactly a high recommendation for a topical treatment for steel...
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dpb wrote:

http://www.monsanto.com/monsanto/content/products/productivity/roundup/back_history.pdf
I heard it from a salesman in a feed & seed store that sells Roundup. I don't claim it to be true, but I see nothing in the Monsanto article that contradicts it. They discuss the product as a herbicide only.

There is a big difference between use and storage. Latex paint is a weatherproof coating but will rust through a metal paint can over time. Stainless steel will rust through if water is stored in it. Again, I don't claim it to be true based on one person's say-so, but nothing in your post proves it to be false either. Bob
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Bob wrote:

...
Well, Roundup doesn't form a protective coating as it is water soluble and reacts w/ steel--not a desirable condition for a protectant. As for SS, some formulations may rust, but many others won't, but whether any SS rusts in the presence of water or not is of no real consequence to the claim that Roundup was ever anything but an herbicide and mot developed for the specific purpose.
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Bob wrote:

...
Well, Roundup doesn't form a protective coating as it is water soluble and reacts w/ steel--not a desirable condition for a protectant. As for SS, some formulations may rust, but many others won't, but whether any SS rusts in the presence of water or not is of no real consequence to the claim that Roundup was ever anything but an herbicide and not developed for the specific purpose.
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Most types of stainless won't. A few will.
It also depends on what is in the water. The sorts of stainless we usually come into contact won't do well with mild to moderately corrosive liquids. But there are types of stainless that do tolerate it quite well.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Chris Lewis wrote:

...
Most definitely!!! l learned this in spades when was working to develop wireless accelerometer w/ intended application primarily for paper manufacturing where chlorine bleach is still used in some processes--did some tests w/ just ordinary household bleach diluted in water and overnight many test samples of the initial choices of various potential SS's turned to junk. Turned out to be a very expensive problem to solve as the alloys that were suitable were both much more expensive raw material and much more difficult to machine...
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If you think that's bad... Imagine if you will, trying to do mine dewatering at 5000gpm, with a head lift of 5000'.
That's one of the challenges my father had to face - being a civil engineer for a company that specializes in specing/engineering/selling/ servicing such stuff.
Mine water is _highly_ corrosive, and may be acidic or caustic. And can change from one to the other over time. And has abrasive grits in it just to make things more difficult.
[The mine in question's pump impeller failed. From the manufacturer, the impeller would have cost a hideous amount. Instead, my dad's company elected to machine a new SS impeller. 12 stage impeller, about 12' long. Driven by a multi thousand horsepower electric motor. As I understand it, the impeller weighed a ton or so, and ended up costing about $25K to produce, and that with inhouse machinists. Ouch!]
[Why the mine did it with a single pump/lift of 5000' I don't know. Staging would have been a lot easier I'd have thought.]
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

...
...
Interestingly enough, in another life I did work at mines and prep plants (we had a line of online ash and elemental analyzers) so I know quite a bit about keeping stuff alive in that environment, too.... :) As you say, relatively speaking, the paper plants were tough, but in different ways. I just used the example to agree w/ you that various SS are good for different applications like any other material. There are a whole lot more kinds and characteristics thereof than we generally think of when we just say something is "stainless".

...
That I don't quite understand either, but for a pump how about 131.6E6 lb/hr @ 2250 psia, 555 F? :) Works out to about 4 Mgal/min in round numbers. What impressed me w/ them (other than the size when standing near one, of course) was that the input work from the pumps was all the energy input to raise primary from ambient to the 550F reactor inlet operating temperature...
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says... :) Can Poison Ivy be killed without harmful chemicals like Roundup? :) Is there a safer chemical to use? :) :) :) -- :) Bertie Brink :) Life is a sexually transmitted disease. R. D. Laing :) http://www.setdefault.com/ : http://www.csmonitor.com / :) It's a watery fluid of mostly sodium chloride and urea with 2- methylphenol and 4-methyphenol mixed in. Gloves should be used while using this solution near poison ivy, but there will zero effect on the environment, but do show caution in the heat if you seem to be using mass amounts of it, drink plenty of fluids.
--
Lar

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Bertie Brink wrote:

What's your beef with RoundUp? It's probably the safest, most environmentally friendly herbicide on the planet. It biodegrades the moment it touches the soil. It's easy to mix and use, it doesn't stink, and it works. Every product should work so well.
I have killed HUNDREDS of square feet of dense poison ivy infestations with RoundUp. It usually takes 2 or 3 seasons to completely wipe it out so that no new sprouts ever appear again.
I've also killed poison ivy with vines the size of a human ankle, climbing up to 50 feet high on mature trees. In summer I spray what I can reach and let RoundUp weaken the vine. Then in winter, I chop through the vine to cut off its food supply. If anything sprouts from the vine the next spring I hose it down with RoundUp again, and that's usually the end of it.
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