Poison Ivy Removal - Total, Complete ?

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I want to store a kayak on that spot. It's higher than the beach by several feet and therefore less susceptible to storm action.
I'm hyper-sensitive to poison ivy, so I need to clear that spot out in such a way that working there (as in burying a dry-land "Anchor", placing the support blocks for the kayak, and repeatedly placing/retrieving the kayak won't leave me with poison ivy.
This is coastal Southern New Jersey - where poison ivy *really* thrives... I can think of whole areas that seem to be held together by the stuff.
That's a hotel in the background so burning is probably not an option - although if somebody says liberal application of a flame weeder will do the trick that might be doable.
This does not have to happen tomorrow, or next week, or even next month. Storm season is coming and it's probably best to wait until next spring to actually place the kayak.
Meanwhile, I'd like to kill that poison ivy, have it stay killed, and not get a case of the stuff preparing/using the site.
Short-term, there's no need for any vegetation at all to survive in that area.
Long term, I'd try to plant it with beach grass and fertilize it hoping to maintain a poison ivy-free/erosion-free zone.
Anybody have a plan?
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 9/16/2015 5:45 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I think the only "high probability of success" is likely to be replacing the "soil" with something in which plants can't grow. E.g., some asphalt, concrete, etc.

Even deploying herbicides will probably only be a temporary measure. Sands "move" during storms and nominal beach activity. So, any treated "soil" will eventually move or be overblown.
You might also encounter some regulatory issues trying to deploy certain strong chemicals on the beachfront (assuming you even have the "right" to modify the property).

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On Wednesday, September 16, 2015 at 9:17:51 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

Or even if removing/changing natural vegetation that close to the beach is allowed at all. NJ is one of the places with a lot of regulations and with both environmental concerns, leaving nature in place to help prevent storm surges, etc, I wouldn't be surprised that there are restrictions.
Assuming it is OK, then I would use one of the brush killers that are available.
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trader_4 wrote, on Thu, 17 Sep 2015 04:42:28 -0700:

Glyphosate alone, while not the best for killing ivy with a foliar spray method, dissolves well in water, and is rather biodegradable, so, it's approved for use within so many (hundreds?) of feet of a drinking water supply.
The problem with any herbicide, including glyphosate mixtures, is that the adjuvants added to aid in surface wetting are generally as bad, or worse, to the environment and to you.
I'm not saying it's at the critical level - but - my point is only that you have to look at ALL the ingredients, when you worry about collateral damage danger.
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I really don't see any poison ivy there. Is that stuff near the back all poison ivy?

Can't see anything there.

Can you mow that? Looks like a beach. I don't think you can do much with that at all. Set up some saw horses, put kayak on top? Wear shoes, socks, long pants and you'll be fine.
--
Dan Espen

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On Wednesday, September 16, 2015 at 9:49:30 PM UTC-4, net cop wrote:

That's a good point too. I don't see anything either, but the pics aren't that detailed, I was assuming there is in fact poison ivy there.
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Per Dan Espen:

The photo's detain is not all that good, but the stuff is everywhere - thick enough to show up green in the right foreground.
I'd expect a huge case of poison ivy if I tried to mow it - having had total coverage on both legs once just by standing downwind of burning poison ivy...... mower spraying a mist of sap and all that.
--
Pete Cresswell

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Per Bob F:

I have never used a flame weeder and figured there was at least a possibility that it simply cooked the target rather than setting it on fire.
Now I know...
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Thu, 17 Sep 2015 16:06:38 -0400, "(PeteCresswell)" wrote:

I once looked into them. The removal tends to not be very permanent. If the weed is dry, the tops burn off, leaving the roots okay. It grows back. You need to use them after it has rained. With the plant saturated, the heat will conduct down the roots and damages the roots. Somewhat.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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(PeteCresswell) wrote, on Thu, 17 Sep 2015 10:20:36 -0400:

Why?
If you mow it, the sap will be all over the place (I know, because I have mulched it, and I have chainsawed it). This, I agree.
But, remember, you're taking precautions, right?
So, you have long pants, calf-length socks, boots, long-sleeve shirt, gloves, etc., so, the "splatter" gets on your clothes (where it will form tell-take black "lacquer" spots, later, when it gets wet and oxidizes.
So what?
You ruin a shirt and pants. That's about it.
If, perchance, some of the splatter gets on your skin (it's almost inevitable, given that we get careless in our work), then the cleanup procedure I mentioned will help a lot, especially if the patch is so small that you can mow it in less than about 20 minutes and then immediately wash up.
If you can do the job and subsequent shower cleanup in about a half hour, then there is much less chance (always some chance, but a lot less) of the delayed type IV cell-mediated hypersensitivity effect taking hold.
You can wash your mower and boots and gloves at your convenience later.
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Bob F wrote, on Thu, 17 Sep 2015 07:38:32 -0700:

Just to be clear, and to back up what *everyone* else already said.
DO NOT BURN. Period.
Mowing won't work, alone anyway, either, because it can resprout.
Foliar application should work, as does cut-stem application (depending on the diameter of the stems).
If you must mow, you can spray, then wait a few days, then spray again, then wait a few days, then mow, and then spray directly after mowing.
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On Wednesday, September 16, 2015 at 7:45:25 PM UTC-5, (PeteCresswell) wrote: >

I don't see definite poison ivy in the pics, but if so I also don't see a good resolution. It takes multiple applications of herbicide to kill it and you would also be killing the grasses, and that's illegal on many shores because grasses control erosion.
Also remember to avoid any poison ivy area during or after a rain. The oils wash off the plant and float on any standing water. I learned that from experience when fishing near a creek bank and sticking my hand in the water.
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RedAlt5 wrote, on Wed, 16 Sep 2015 19:29:12 -0700:

This is an interesting observation, because urushiol is not really an "oil" in the strict sense of the word.
The urushiol is (sort of) an alcohol (specifically a catechol, which is a diol of benzene, which is simply benzene with two OH groups) suspended in an oily sap (a plant oleoresin).
The catechol alone is actually rapidly soluble in water because the two OH groups allow hydrogen bonding, and, in fact, sulfonic acid catechols are commonly dissolved in human urine, by way of example.
But urushiol has an attached aliphatic hydrocarbon chain, which then makes the molecule partially hydrophobic (and slightly "oily").
Given all that, I guess the oily oleoresin containing urushiol could "float" on water, in which case, it would do what you said. I will need to look that up though, as much of what people say about poison oak is based on "bro logic", but not science.
I must admit though, until you said that it floats on water, that I had never thought of that - so - I will need to look it up further before I can say, either way, whether urushiol floats on water, or not.
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On 09/17/2015 12:32 AM, Danny D. wrote:

I've done some informal testing on myself and I've found that I can rub poison ivy leaves on most areas of my arms and legs, wait 90 minutes and wash it off with no reaction. Unfortunately, two hours gets me the expected nasty reaction.
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50% roundup...... 50% poision ivy killer sprayed from a small spray bottle applied to actively growing poision ivy will kill it dead. DO NOT PRUNE or remove any vegation / leaves the killer stuff is absorbed thru the leaves!
this will be a lifetime project, poision ivy will over time grow back.
NEVER BURN POISION IVY, the smoke can give you poision ivy in your lungs. if your very sensitive to it this can kill you.
its probably easier to pick a area not infected with poision ivy and store you kayack at a different location.
incidently the roots, even if dead can give you the rash too.
its best to stock up on steroids before proceeding
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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 17 Sep 2015 03:55:55 -0700 (PDT), bob haller

And even before it kills you, when your lungs itch, how do you scratch them? How do you put calamine lotion inside your lungs? It sounds like worse than anything I've ever had to have poison ivy in my lungs.
Actually, i never got any good results from calamine lotion. I use an aerosol anesthtic, I think with lydocaine. Spraying it on means I don't have to touch the skin and make the itching start up again. I used to use rHuli-Spray, but they don't make that anymore.
This is what they call it now, Johnson and Johnson Calamine Spray. When I looked this up a few years ago, it was also by J&J but it was called First Aid spray or something like that. https://www.mooremedical.com/index.cfm?/Calamine-Spray/&PG=CTL&CS=HOM&FN=ProductDetail&PID 335&spx=1
" Calamine Spray works on contact to provide fast, cooling relief of the itching and pain associated with many minor skin irritations. Calamine based formula dries the oozing and weeping of poison ivy, oak & sumac" I don't care about the oozing and weeping, only the itching. I'm not sure this really is rhuli-spray. I have a can or tube somwhere. I'll try to see whether it contains calamine.

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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 17 Sep 2015 09:29:34 -0400, micky

It uses benzocaine. If you don't have benzocaine, you can use your benzene cigarette lighter for the same effect, maybe.

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On 9/17/2015 9:33 AM, micky wrote:

I'm curious what is a benzene cigarette lighter?
I've seen sun burn spray with lidocaine.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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In alt.home.repair, on Thu, 17 Sep 2015 10:08:35 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I guess I was thinking of propane and butane fuels. Maybe there is nothing that burns benzene.

Maybe it used to use lidocaine. My main point is that it's an anestheitic spray and that's what matters to me. Not the calamine.
One spraying can last for 4 hours iirc. as long as I don't touch the part with the rash.

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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Thu, 17 Sep 2015 10:08:35 -0400:

Since the neurons are damaged by the cytokines, anything that prevents neurons from transmitting "should" work.
I don't see how "calamine" can work, given it doesn't seem to affect neurons firing.
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