Poison ivy

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Soap is alot easier on you than gasolene, all you need to do is break down the oil residue of poison ive oak or sumac and wash it off, hand soap, dish soap work fine but dont forget the shoes and pants, if gas is close by and the only thing I guess I would use it probably alot of chemicals in my garage would break down the oil.
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On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 04:25:34 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

It might not be alive to begin with.
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mm wrote:

Exactly. I never heard of living oil, poison ivy oil or any other. If oil was living, we could just keep harvesting new crude oil instead of drilling for more!
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The active ingrediant of poison ivy is termed an oil, Eurushiol. Thats why it can stay active 12 months on tools, clothing etc. Soapy water is the quickest way to wash it off, but getting it off quickly is most important. You can walk throught it or your pet does and that night take off your shoes or pet yout dog, rub your eyes, take a piss, and the next morning be itching.
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3 weeks ago my buddy went out for a bike ride. His front tire slipped off the pavement and he crashed face first into a pile of Poison Ivy. The bruises got better in a week or so and he fixed the bike. He was thinking he got lucky with the Poison Ivy.
I got an email last night. His arms and face are showing the tell-tale rash and he's beginning to itch.
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When I was pulling and burning poison ivy vines I didnt shower that night, I was partying big time, My face, arms, where I scratched and used the bathroom, about everywhere in a few days got me, 2 treatments of seriods failed, my arms has 250 or so welts some the size of dimes and 1/4"high, the hospital wanted me admitted and said its so bad it has to be something else. It affected my health from breathing it for years and spontaniously re appeared every 6 months for maybe 3 years on my fingers. I felt for along time like I would die and couldnt work. Itching was a nightmare. Then I didnt know poison ivy grew as a vine, I was clearing land and soaked in the poison and in the smoke as we burnt it. That day ruined the rest of my summer. I wonder what the Indians did. I could imagine it being used to torture people, by being tied into a patch for a few days. So any 3 leaf plant scares me, but I pulled some the other day by mistake and just used a bar of soap amd water and im fine.
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On Wed, 28 Jul 2010 16:35:21 -0700, ransley wrote:

Ouch! It's strange stuff; two of my kids get it bad (although not that bad), the other could roll around in the stuff and not have any problem. Me, I can run my hands through it and expect four or five little bumps a few days later, but that's it. I've heard that "immunity" (or the opposite) can come and go in people, too.
That Zanfel stuff works great for treating it on anyone I've known who gets it bad, but it's insanely expensive :-(
It's all over in the woodland around our property, so no chance of ever completely getting rid of it.
cheers
Jules
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ransley wrote:

Yes, I already knew that. Actually I think it can remain potent for more than a year. And it's not just the leaves, the whole dang vine has urushiol in/on it.
http://poisonivy.aesir.com/view/fastfacts.html
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A distinction needs to be made between soap and detergent. Soap will not remove oils, you need a detergent for that. So washing clothes in a washing machine will work, it uses a detergent. But washing with soap and water will not work.
For washing after handling PI, I found 2 things that work well. Fels Naptha bar detergent can be found in the laundry section of hardware or grocery stores. I guess it used to contain napthalene, which will dissolve oils well. Now it doesn't so it's safe for household use. The fact that it says it's used to pre-treat clothes, and that it has surfactants in it highly suggest that it would be a detergent. The other solution I have had success with is Tec-Nu. It's a thick liquid that I rub on my arms and legs after handling PI, then wash off in the shower. Tec-Nu is expensive, $12 for a bottle but it will last for many applications and works well.
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Ive been exposed 20+ times since my big time in 86, bar hand soap is all ive used and I have had no outbreak. Any hand soap breaks down poison ivys oils so water can wash it away, even just hosing your hands after touching it has keep me from having any problems. But I wash within 15 minutes of pulling it.
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I agree. The trick is to wash well right away. I fight it in our yard. As long as I know I've been in it I can avoid the rash.
I use gloves and wash them well with the other cloths I was wearing in the laundry with a heavy shot of detergent and extra time on the dial. But I use those cheap contruction gloves from lowes, few bucks a pair. They hold up for 3 or 4 washings and then they're trash.
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ransley wrote:

Yes, soap does dissolve and remove oils. Maybe not all oils as well as a detergent but for poison ivy, Ivory soap has worked for me for 30 years. I shower within 1 hour of contact, (I lather and rinse twice). Immediately wash outside with soap/detergent if I have some scratches that may have been exposed. Get the cheap $1 gloves and throw them away. Actually I seldom use any gloves unless it's a big job. Depending on how much my clothing was exposed, I'll undress in the laundry room, or many times on the front porch (I'm not so sure everyone here can do that without risk of arrest). The clothing goes straight to the washing machine and me straight to the shower. I also wash the shower knobs after I've touched them.
Some people still think you can spread it by contacting the oozing blisters, thats an old wives tale. Once you wash well, you can't spread it. It's not a disease, it's an allergic reaction to the oil. Once the oil is gone, no chance of spreading it.
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On 7/28/2010 5:30 AM teabird spake thus:

This is what's called a distinction without a difference.
Detergent *is* soap. (Of course, not all soap is detergent.) You could look it up.
All soaps work basically the same way, by attracting and binding oils. They may do it in different ways, or better or worse, but they all will remove oils to some extent. (Soap is actually fairly magical stuff, consisting of molecules that have one end that's polar and one that's non-polar: the polar end is hydrophilic and attracts water, while the non-polar end is hydrophobic and attracts oil.)
Soap and water *will* work, given enough soap and elbow grease.
Hey, I even ran across a web page that describes all this as it regards poison ivy: http://poisonivy.aesir.com/view/soap.html
--
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ALWAYS WASH WITH COLD WATER, hot water opens the pores, making any exposure worse...
And avoid vigirous scrubbing so you DONT rub the poision oil into it.......
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As an aside, I just found an excellent way to relieve the itching from Poison Ivy, having recently come in contact with some.
Use a blow dryer. Blow dry the area for a minute or so at the highest heat you can stand - just don't burn your skin. The itching will get really intense and then suddenly disappear.
Go on, Google it and see. People rave about it and now I do too.
It has something to do with both drying out the oozing from the rash as well as fooling the nerves with the heat. I "blew dry" the rash and the itching would go away for 6 - 8 hours at a time.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I've used hot baths for mosquito bites when the itching got really bad or the bites were numerous....I think the heat just increases the circulation, and thus the antibody/immune reaction and gets it over with more quickly. Itching would increase for a little bit, in the warm bath, but then be essentially gone by the time I finished. Careful with that hair dryer...if the itching is bad enough, may not feel skin burning.
Hot shower, along with careful stretching exercise, got rid of really nasty tendonitis of shoulder...after trying Rx anti-inflammatory that made my stomach hurt. Didn't want bleeding ulcer, so quit those.
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wrote:

re: "I've used hot baths for mosquito bites when the itching got really bad or the bites were numerous"
Oh, come on...be honest.
You just needed an excuse to luxuriate in a long hot bubble bath to relieve the stress of the day.
"Sorry darling, but my mosquito bites are really itchy. I need to take a long, hot bath. By the way, could you bring me a glass of wine?"
;-)
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I'm fair skinned and rather sensitive, so when I have a bunch of skeeter bites, I don't need any further irritation....would go for the wine, though :o)
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Don't forget the candles!
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Tip for anyone that needs to take those anti-inflammatory meds:
Take them with a glass of milk.
It reduces stomach problems very effectively.
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