plywood, hardboard or else

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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 12:22:11 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

ce of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this picture http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_ 2_hoh_6.jpg my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not b e able to tear it up. thank you so much.

the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 90 d egree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizontal o utput of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe go es up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the pipe /vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a ve nt pipe coming through the wall.
thanks for the reply, that pipe i traced it and it is for a fan which is mo unted inside a wall. i do not know i might disconnect that fan and use that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys think?
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On 6/23/2013 7:59 AM, leza wang wrote:

basement window. I will cut the window screen and mount the cap on a piece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this picture
http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_2_hoh_6.jpg
my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

You could replace that with an aluminimum vent, and then connect that to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 90 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizontal output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the pipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a vent pipe coming through the wall.

mounted inside a wall. i do not know i might disconnect that fan and use that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys think? I'd like to see a picture of the fan, inside the laundry room, before deciding
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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 8:07:31 AM UTC-4, RBM wrote:

iece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this pictu re http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_ven t_2_hoh_6.jpg my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else ? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 9 0 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizonta l output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the p ipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a vent pipe coming through the wall.

that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys thin k?

thanks RBM, please see the video below

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dq2HNmwIdHI&feature=youtu.be

thank you.
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On Sun, 23 Jun 2013 07:05:55 -0700 (PDT), leza wang

basement window. I will cut the window screen and mount the cap on a piece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this picture
http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_2_hoh_6.jpg
my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

You could replace that with an aluminimum vent, and then connect that to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 90 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizontal output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the pipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a vent pipe coming through the wall.

mounted inside a wall. i do not know i might disconnect that fan and use that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys think?

I liked it with very little sound. You could be producing movies like Alfred Hitchcock used to make.
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I agree, spooky.
Greg
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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 8:07:31 AM UTC-4, RBM wrote:

iece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this pictu re http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_ven t_2_hoh_6.jpg my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else ? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 9 0 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizonta l output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the p ipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a vent pipe coming through the wall.

that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys thin k?

please see this video of my laundry room. thank you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dq2HNmwIdHI&feature=youtu.be

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On 6/23/2013 10:07 AM, leza wang wrote:

basement window. I will cut the window screen and mount the cap on a piece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this picture
http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_2_hoh_6.jpg
my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

You could replace that with an aluminimum vent, and then connect that to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 90 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizontal output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the pipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a vent pipe coming through the wall.

mounted inside a wall. i do not know i might disconnect that fan and use that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys think?

a hole down low which could have been for a dryer vent, or possibly something else behind that board. If there's not, I think I'd make a hole to the right of the window instead of loosing part of the window.
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On 6/23/2013 11:41 AM, RBM wrote:

Here's what I find interesting...
In Leza's previous thread, you (RBM) specifically asked her:
"It looks like a wall mounted exhaust fan. Is it a bathroom on the other side of that wall?"
To which she very politely replied:
"Thanks for the reply, no not bathroom but the dryer and washer there behind that half wall. the whole room is for the dryer, washer, furnace and hot tank water."
Now she tells (and shows) us that the box is indeed for a wall mounted exhaust fan.
I wonder why she didn't tell us that when you asked. Maybe she wasn't at home at the time?
In any case, I don't know if that's a hole behind the dryer. It almost looks like the dryer was never connected to anything and the hot air has just been blowing on the wall melting the paint.
Hard to tell....Leza?
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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 11:41:12 AM UTC-4, RBM wrote:

piece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this pic ture http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_v ent_2_hoh_6.jpg my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or el se? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will n ot be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

at to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 90 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizon tal output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pi pe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the pipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a vent pipe coming through the wall.

e that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys th ink?

+1
Simple and straightforward, how it should be done. The laundry room in on an outside wall. Make a hole, put in a dryer vent. Using a window is a sure sign of a hack job. Also, that vent fan, installed where it is, makes no sense to me. Looks like somone decided to vent the dryer into the laundry room, then put in a fan to ventilate the laundry room. Bad.....
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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 2:20:15 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

a piece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this p icture http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer _vent_2_hoh_6.jpg my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

that to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 90 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horiz ontal output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to t he pipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to sh ow a vent pipe coming through the wall.

use that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys think?

ok now i have this question, who can do the hole in the wall? who should i call? i can go to yellow page and look but under which trade? thanks
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On 6/23/2013 4:05 PM, leza wang wrote:

What about our question related to the bottom of the wall behind the dryer? Is that a hole or just melted paint?
As far as a new hole in the wall for the vent, what is the wall made of? Based on the slanted sill below the window, I'm guessing it's a block wall, perhaps parged (coated) with a layer of cement and then painted?
How is the exterior of the wall finished? Siding of some kind? Stucco? Something else?
Details, my friend, details. ;-)
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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 6:19:34 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

ok sure i am happy to answer all your question so you can help me better. f irst, i found out later that the box is for a wall mounted fan. about the w ood blocks you saw in the video, they are there to hide melted paint/wall! it is not a hole yet but it is wet area. i think it is time to fix that too but not sure what is the material is used. i do not think it is drywall, i t is old house so i think it is blaster... the outside is wood (or hardboa rd) siding
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Re: "it is a wet area"
OK, before you even worry about whether the interior wall finish is plaster or drywall, you need to deal with the moisture. Moisture will lead to mold, rot, insects, and many other problems. You need to find out where the moisture is coming from and eliminate the cause before you worry about fixing the interior finish of the wall.
Back to your dryer vent, you haven't told us what the wall itself is made from. Is it a block wall or a poured wall or a wood stud wall?
If it's a wood stud wall, any decent handy person should be able to drill a 4” hole and properly install a dryer vent. If it's a block or poured wall, that's a different story. It would help us help you if we knew what the wall itself was made of.
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I don't see how it could be a hole. Look at the window. 4 or 5 feet high. That means the soil outside is just below the window. Who puts a dryer vent 4 feet below the surface of the ground?
The ghostly part of the video starts when the camera is 90 degrees turned at the start. That's a trick I don't remember Hitchcock using.
I can't answer Leza's other questions, because I'm not there and just don't have enough feel for it.
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On 6/23/2013 4:05 PM, leza wang wrote:

on basement window. I will cut the window screen and mount the cap on a piece of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this picture
http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_2_hoh_6.jpg
my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.

post? You could replace that with an aluminimum vent, and then connect that to the pipe that you are connecting to the back of your dryer. I have a 90 degree adapter that goes on the back of my dryer to convert the horizontal output of the dryer to vertical output, then the aluminimum flexible pipe goes up and makes gradual bend to horizontal and then it connects to the pipe/vent that goes through the wall. Your earlier picture seemed to show a vent pipe coming through the wall.

mounted inside a wall. i do not know i might disconnect that fan and use that pipe for the dryer. i really think it is good idea. what you guys think?

proper dryer vent kit
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leza wang wrote:

Handyman or capenter. Handyman would probably be best for such a small thing but get and check with 2-4 recent past customers.
--

dadiOH
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leza wang wrote:

http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_2_hoh_6.jpg

You have raccoon problems? In Toronto? I live in central Florida and we have raccoons, possums, wild pigs, bobcats, a rare bear or puma, eagles, hawks and once a 10' python but I've never had a raccoon problem.
If it were me I'd probably go to a sheet metal shop and have them bend some heavy weight aluminum into an open box the size of the board you need. I'd have them make the edges as wide as will fit so that I could get a piece of insulating foam to cut, fit and glue (contact or spray adhesive) inside the open aluminum box. If necessary for structural strength, I'd screw strips of 3/4 x3/4 inch wood onto the inside of the aluminum frame edges before putting in the foam. The inside of the foam could be painted - the foam I'm thinking of has a thin, metallic material on one side - or covered with thin plywood or even covered with a glued on decorative fabric or wallpaper.
That should thwart coons, won't rot and provides a bit of insulating for those cold Canadian times.
--

dadiOH
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Oren wrote:

Of course not!!
It was draped over the hood of my ex FIL's car in his garage. He was useless in helping me catch it so I had him call a trapper. Trapper and I corraled it, bagged it - not easy, FIL had recently moved here, brought 16 tons of junk with him most of which was also in the garage - and he took it away promising to find it a loving home. Yeah, right.
--

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leza wang wrote:

http://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_2_hoh_6.jpg

This video that you posted later on in this thread helps and it answers a lot of questions:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dq2HNmwIdHI&feature=youtu.be
.
About the existing vent/fan that is already in the wall..., my guess is that maybe this laundry area used to be something else (a bathroom/powder room?) and maybe a previous owner put in the wall mounted fan to vent the room to the outside. And, maybe the laundry room wall switch also activates the fan. But, it doesn't matter now since that was a prior question and it doesn't seem like it would make sense to try to connect the dryer vent to that venting system anyway(with or without the fan) because it is in a poor location in relation to the dryer.
Now, about the dryer vent idea.
I think the easiest way to vent the dryer (at least for now) would be to vent it through one of the 3 panes that are in the existing window (the pane on the right). You could get a small piece of 1/4-inch or 1/2-inch plywood; cut to the right size to place it over the one window pane on the right; screw it to the inside of the window right into the wood around that pane (on the right, top, and bottom); and use that piece of plywood to create the vent hole. Obviously, cut the hole on the plywood before screwing it into place, and obviously, break or cut out the glass in that one pane first so the dryer vent can go through. Then place the exterior dryer vent in that hole and attach it to the dryer with metal dryer vent hose. You have the option of using solid metal dryer vent piping and connections, or flexible metal dryer vent hose (the stronger type), or the flimsy metal type that looks like a wire spring with what looks like thin aluminum foil wrapped around it (don't use that last idea).
A less easy, but probably better idea, would be to just cut a hole in the wall next to the window and place the dryer vent there. How easy or difficult that may be will depend on what the wall is made of. From some previous photos that you posted about new siding, the trees, a fence, etc., it looks like it may be a cinder or concrete block wall with maybe a real or fake brick veneer exterior.
My guess is that you could do either of these yourself since you did the new floor in your home yourself.
If you decide to have someone else do it, it would be a fairly simple handyman job.
If you are motivated and want to give it a try on your own, I would vote for running the dryer vent through the wall next to the window. You first have to figure out how to break out a hole for the vent. You could use a fairly heavy hammer (like a small hand-held sledge hammer) and a chisel for concrete or brick and try breaking it out little by little. I would suggest marking the correct location and starting on the outside. If you have the right type of drill equipment and/or a hammer drill, you could try that, but doing it by hand may work.
After you create the hole, and the vent is in place, you will need to fill in around the vent with mortar mix (sort of like cement) that you just mix with water and pack in the space and smooth it out.
The hardest part is figuring out if you can create the hole in the wall on your own without having to hire someone else to do that part. You can try it on your own and see how it goes.
Good luck.
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On Saturday, June 22, 2013 10:23:59 PM UTC-5, leza wang wrote:

of wood and then place it on the window. similar what is in this picture h ttp://images.houseofhepworths.com/2012/03/12dryer_vent_window/dryer_vent_2_ hoh_6.jpg my question: is it better to use hardboard or plywood or else? I want something strong so it can last also animals like raccoon will not be able to tear it up. thank you so much.
Re the "melted paint" referred to in pater posts. I have seen heated paint ed surafaces/areas, the paint may apppear scorched or turned brown/black by the heat, but never melted. The paint film is too thin to be able to melt . Maybe it is just an english language misunderstnding.
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