Plus 90 Heat Exchanger

I have a Bryant Plus 90 which has a clogged heat exchanger. Bryant is refusing to replace it since they say it was caused by "bad gas." Anyone else having this problem with Bryant not honoring their warranties? I told this to our gas company and they said it is Bryant and not them. Anyone know how to approach this problem?
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Try some DiGel. That usually takes care of bad gas.......
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As a Bryant dealer that has installed many Plus 90's and never had a problem, no.
Are you running the unit on LP or natural gas? How old is the unit, what's the model and serial number? I would first rule out the quality of the gas rather than automatically take the word of the "gas company." Then there are installation and set-up issues that have to be dealt with. Let me know what area you are in, is it your installer/service company that's telling you the warranty is refused or have you spoken directly with Bryant?
- Robert
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We are running LP. It was the company who installed it about ten years ago. Have not taken it up with Bryant as of yet. I am in Middle Tennessee - Tullahoma area Model Number Is 350MAV036080 Serial Number Is 3096A02364
Thanks, Blake

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I don't believe a word of it. Do you realize how regulated the propane refineries are? I think its a poor install.
Propane gas is regulated, more than United Technologies is regulated who made your furnace.
A plugged heat exchanger is due to a possibility of several things, and most are on the installers side with poor installations.
I would DEMAND to see a letter from Bryant stating 'bad gas', you will never get one.
Sooting or plugging of a heat exchanger can be the result of, but not limited to:
Flame impingement, this is where the flames are hitting/touching the heat exchanger and this causes sooting Gas pressure too high so the oxygen mixture is too low and this allows sooting Poor scrubbing within the heat exchanger causes sooting, this is when the air & fuel do not mix well, like oil burning by itself, it is smoky. Lack of combustion air, this is a biggy. Did they run the fresh air pipe for combustion outside? Does it exceed the maximum amount of feet for the pipe with the number of elbows they installed? Even if the furnace runs and has a cut out switch for lack of combustion air it still could be lacking air
Contaminated combustion air, are they taking it out of the crawl space which is damp or an attic instead of the outside?
Oversized furnace can cause sooting with propane. This situation causes the furnace to cycle a great deal and never get to operating temperature for efficient combustion.
Too cold of a return air causing the heat exchanger to be too cold on start up and the fumes condense and then soot up over time.
Notice that their is only one thing I mentioned that the factory can be the trouble and everything else is the installer or the gas? I doubt VERY seriously that you have 'bad' gas!
Ask to see the combustion analysis of the unit when it was started up, what the Oxygen, CO, and CO2 was, I bet they won't even know what your talking about!
Rich Liberty HVAC

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