Plumbing project? ? ?

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Let me say at the outset that I am well aware that I can get only an educated guess in response to this posting, but I would welcome an educated guess or even pure speculation.
We live in a six-unit coop apartment building built in 1922. It's a very solid building which has been well-maintained and it in very good shape considering its age.
The apartments are identical in layout, two on each floor.
The fourth floor consists of six rooms which were once occupied by servant girls. It was a dormitory arrangement, with a shared bathroom at one end of the hallway, and a shared kitchen at the other.
Around 1950 these rooms ceased to be used for habitation and were converted to storage. At that same time, the hot and cold water pipes were cut and plugged.
To get to my question: What's likely to be involved if we reconnect the water supply? (To make the rooms habitable once again.)
The old pipes all remain in place, but I'm sure they are so corroded and rusted inside that replacement with copper would be essential.
I emphasize that all of the bathrooms are stacked in the same vertical configuration. I'm pretty sure that the old pipes have been replaced in the apartments through the years.
So I guess the second question is, is it likely that we can simply extend the pipes from the third-floor bathroom to the fourth-floor bath?
To repeat, I'm aware that I'm asking for a diagnosis done with a blindfold. I'm sure all sorts of issues, like water pressure etc., would come into consideration. But we do know that at one time the plumbing worked on the fourth floor, and we'd like to restore it if possible.
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While copper is good, you might also look into flexible PEX lines if it will make installation easier.
And even if we assume that you're 40 feet above the water inlet, that will represent only about a 17 psi pressure drop from elevation change. It's not a huge issue unless water pressure is already weak.
Are you doing the work yourself?
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Does the rest of the building have the same original pipes that are on the 4th floor? Why do you assume the disconnected sections are now bad if the original is not bad?
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Most, maybe all, of the original pipes on the first three floors have been replaced with copper.
"jamesgangnc" wrote in message wrote:

Does the rest of the building have the same original pipes that are on the 4th floor? Why do you assume the disconnected sections are now bad if the original is not bad?
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Then I woul dgo ahead and replace the 4th floor with copper as well. Or cpvc.
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"mike" wrote in message
While copper is good, you might also look into flexible PEX lines if it will make installation easier.
And even if we assume that you're 40 feet above the water inlet, that will represent only about a 17 psi pressure drop from elevation change. It's not a huge issue unless water pressure is already weak.
Are you doing the work yourself?
--------------------------------
Good grief no! It's 'way above my pay grade!!!!
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Location of building? LA? NYC? Chicago?
Too many unkowns & questions to handle via NG conversation....... too much typing.
this is "phone call" topic, at 'til its narrrowed down
restoration is easily possible (even on a DIY basis) on a temporary trial (with appropirate valving") just o "give it a try". Could be be done in a few hours to a day's worth of "qucik & dirty"
cheers Bob
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If you hire a license contractor that knows what he or she is doing then the new EPA lead laws are going to cost you a bundle because its going to involve making holes in the walls both on the third and fourth floors. You might want to do the demolition yourself to save money but make sure you know where to demolish before you do. You can extend the pipes as long as youre not extending off a line which would be too small to branch out from. If you do then more than one person using the water isnt going to get enough pressure. Branching off of a line is probably going to be O.K. but I wouldnt bet my life on it.
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Also if you have tenants or plan on having tenants they can sue you for not abiding by the EPA lead laws.
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Rent to illegal aliens and al you need is a cold water tap and a bucket.
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If the OP said "The old pipes all remain in place" why do you assume that "its going to involve making holes in the walls both on the third and fourth floors."?
If the pipes are still serviceable then all that may be involved is to cut/sweat off the cap and use a junction to connect any extensions that are needed.
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The OP said this:
"The old pipes all remain in place, but I'm sure they are so corroded and rusted inside that replacement with copper would be essential. "
That and the fact that the place was built in 1922 suggest that the existing pipe is probably galvanized steel. But you have a point, we don't know for sure what kind of pipe it is. It's impossible to be of much help on this kind of thing, as there are way too many variables involved.
PEX run from the existing baths might be a solution, but we don't know the pipe sizes and if they can support a second bath.
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On Nov 4, 1:56pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

re: "but we don't know the pipe sizes and if they can support a second bath."
I prefer that all of my baths be supported by floor joists of the proper size.
IMHO, supporting a bath with the pipes is just asking for trouble.
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I believe trad used "support" in the sense of making sure there was enough water available. That's how I read it, anyway. ;)
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cavedweller wrote the following:

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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DerbyDad03 didn't think he needed a smiley in this instance.
He should have known better.
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On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 13:44:30 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

He knew better. When you go fishing, do you attach a sign saying "bait" next the hook?
Edward
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wrote:

Does anybody check to see who posted what in this NG?
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Ayup......whooosshhh.
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buffalo ny: hire a local architect for a consultation, and hire him to determine: 1. legal "use" permit including zoning compliance from your town for the change in use in your licensed multiple dwelling or whatever is its present legal use. it is possible that fourth floor was decommissioned for a legal use change in 1950 for compliance with minimum building code /fire/health requirements as a six unit multiple dwelling of only the first three three stories in height and you have no legal permitted use for habitable space at that level today or in the future within reasonable cost within your budget. if this is a wood frame building you may have upcoming fire separation improvement requirements. (think fire rated drywall.) 2. plumbing permit from a master plumber and his estimate for updating the plumbing. make sure of the water pressure and volume and main water line is 1" or bigger and has succicient city pressure to get to that altitude. 3. safe fire egress stairwells or fire escapes needed to comply with current code. 4. architect will oversee contractors and plumbing after submitting plans for approval. if you don't have plans in your hand, start praying that a copy exists: go to town hall and start digging as they were filed in 1922. architects have to sign them out and make working copies for you and your architect. 5. if co-op means you live in an upper and want to blast thru the third floor ceiling to make a connecting loft with a stairway into level 4, make sure your architect knows your complete goal as there are load and support issues. 6. if a roof deck, pool, or garden is part of your dream, make sure approvals and plans include it and plumbing and electricity and drainage and deck materials as well since you're already improving the fourth level don't just stop there while you have the government and architect and contractors all in motion. 7. if there is no way to get this approved or the cost is too much, have architect draw an outside 3d view of your dream roof garden and the building for the future owner to drool over as a beautiful dream in his future. -b
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