Plumbing - Newbie needs advice

Hello Everyone,
What should someone consider when they are running new supply lines?
My place has mostly iron pipes, but a section of the piping (the section that supplys cold water to the water heater) is copper. It runs a total of about 5 feet with a couple of right angels. I've practiced soldering copper and I feel comfortable enough to yank out a section of the existing copper and add a T connector to it and then run the copper the rest of the way. I can do the same for the hot supply.
So, my question is, is this the right way to do this? Is there a better way my inexperinced eye is not seeing?
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coolneo wrote:

Get a basic plumbing book how-to for some pics and ideas.
Yes, you can do what you propose. Include shutoff valves at strategic places. On the Hot runs, avoid using one large main (like 3/4"). If you do, it will waste a *lot* of water before it gets hot at the end. Instead, run several smaller (1/2") lines. Insulate all. Cold can be 3/4" with 1/2" branches.
Consider using soft copper Type L tubing where difficult bends have to be made or the pipe snaked thru walls. Avoid low spots in the run. Support the pipe frequently; best to use a resilient mount so the pipe won't squeak with expansion.
Give consideration to the electrical grounding issue. Electrical boxes/fixtures in your house *may* be grounded to the old galv iron. If you disconnect the galv, those grounds will be lost. There was a thread here just this week about it.
Jim
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Thanks Jim.
I got some books and started practicing using short runs. I attached my practice run to a spiggot(?) using a short hose... first practice run... no leaks, every one since (3) had leaks, *ugh*, I have to work on this a bit more.
Thanks again, I appriciate it.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (coolneo) wrote:

Sweat soldering copper is 99% preparation. Make sure the surfaces have been brushed and are bright and shiny. And that everywhere you want solder is fluxed.
If you take apart the bad joints, you'll see that you missed a spot.
And the new, self lighting MAPP gas torches are wonderful.
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created these words:

What about using a glue such as Copper-Bond Epoxy Adhesive? For folks who have a fear of torching their home this seems like an excellent alternative. Has anyone reading this had any experience using it, good or bad?
--

Jeff Bailey
baileyjs[@]yahoo.com
  Click to see the full signature.
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coolneo wrote:

I'm no expert here, but have done a few sweat joints in my time. I would make the connection at the existing line the last one I did. I've had some very frustrating times sweating a joint on an existing line where steam can destroy the joint.
Speedy Jim's prior response is excellent advice as well, as usual.
Peter H
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What about CPVC? Just cut and glue.
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