plumbing - main water line repair

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I don't think I'm following the thread very well but ......
I would suggest doing all the repairs in PVC.
The best is a male PVC thread into a female copper fitting, if I read everything correctly you have a threaded female copper fitting in the mix somewhere.
If you have enough PVC exposed you can bend it out of the ways such that you can use a PVC slip (glue coupling to make the lsat PVC connected.
File out the stop in the PVC coupling such that it slide all the way passed the end of the pipe when glue is applied
Gotta work fast.......
prime both ends of the PVC to be joined AND the coupling slather up the pipe ends w/ glue, then the coupling then a quick recoat on the pipes slid the coupling on passed one pipe align the pipe, slid the coupling to center position & give it a1/4 twist to smear glue
like I said, you gotta work fast! no margin for error.....but you can always cut it out
If you've never done one of these I suggest a practice run with scrap material.
I'd insulate the hole...a couple layers of cardboard or burlap will work but I'd add a 100 watt light bulb to the hole since you're gonna get down into the teens.
cheers Bob
cheers
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Bob, Thanks.
It's pretty simple really I'm beginning to think. Basically, when I cut away the remains of the original joints, I'll have 3/4" copper and 3/4" pvc about 12" apart. I need to join the two together. Another poster sorted it out for me. Sweat a female threaded fitting to 12" or so of 3/4" Copper pipe. Screw in a 3/4" male pvc fitting. Take that into the hole, test fit, and cut the copper to length, and slide on the copper repair coupling fitting. Glue the pvc fitting to the pvc pipe. (I figure I may as well screw in the pvc male fitting to the copper female while I'm out of the hole and can work with it more easily.) Now slide the coupling over the two copper pipes and sweat 'em together. That's probably as good as it's going to get. Alternatively, that 12" or so of ridgid copper could be 18" or so of flex (not the water heater stuff, but rather the stuff that can come in big rolls) with an S shape. That would give the whole assembly some "flex". I like that idea.. kinda like a shock absorber, and it's the same number of joints.
wrote:

to
fit, or

|
The
brass 1"

compression-like
3/4"
sequentially.
from the house, joined to 3/4" from the meter.

a
bent
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Ah, think I just got your point. Basically the mirror of what another suggested to do in copper.
In otherwords you are saying, sweat a female copper fitting to my copper pipe. Glue a pvc male fitting to a pvc pipe. Put that in the hole, cut the pvc to length, screw the pvc into the copper, and then glue-in a repair pvc coupler. Interesting.. and certainly the least expensive. I guess it comes down to -- what's easier / better.. the pvc repair coupler or the copper version. Yep, I can see how time is of the essence w/ the pvc coupler! I've done enough pvc gluing to get the idea and get all the ducks in a row before making the first contact!!
One advantage of the copper is that I can use a bit of the soft copper and build-in a shock absorber of sorts.
wrote:

pipe
adapter
repair
1"
like
provide
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Local plumbing supply suggested..
copper pipe | 1" female flare fitting | 1" male flare fitting to 3/4" male threads (all original to this point) | 3/4" threaded brass female coupler | 3/4" male threads scd 80 pvc to straight pvc pipe | sch 80 pvc coupler | existing pvc pipe
With this there are no sweat joints. According to them, underground sweat joints should be avoided. Anyone have any comments on this?
The 'trick' to this setup is to get the coupler in-place. This coupler has a ridge in the middle, so I'll need to test fit to see if I can make it work. That's about 1" of "jockeying" to get it to fit together.

1"
and
to
pipe
a
copper
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I had already suggested one of these: http://www.doityourself.com/invt/u542829
The "wiggle" room is built into he piece.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
DanG
A live Singing Valentine quartet,
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It's a done deal.
I ended up test fitting to length and then cutting my new 3/4" pvc (male thread on one end) and glueing that to the existing pvc w/ a coupler. Then came the hard part -- getting the flare fitting male to thread into the female. Part of the issue was there was not good way to work inside the tight hole. But eventually.. I got it started and so far so good.
I'd be really interested to understand how to file out the ridge of a pvc coupler. That seems like a slick solution in some of these situations.
So the final result is..
3/4" soft copper | female flare fitting | male flare fitting -to- male 3/4" threads | 3/4" brass female coupler | 3/4" scd 80 male threaded pipe (cut to length) | pvc coupler | original 3/4" pvc pipe
Now if I can hold out during these sub zero degree nights.. and it holds.. then when our soil thaws I can fill the hole back up. As it is.. I have the pipes covered w/ pizza boxes, 2x6's, and under an infrared heat lamp, and the hole covered w/ a 4x8 sheet of plywood.
If this ever happens to you, schedule it for 60 degree days ;-)

connector -->

PVC
looking
waiting
3/4"
(would
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