Plumbing inspector nightmare

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I have done a lot of plumbing. I have NEVER heard the terms WET VENT and DRY VENT. What is he talking about?
I can not tell you about the number of vents, that depends on local code. However, you might be able to "grandfather" in what you have. Prove the former inspector passed it.
As for Fernco couplings, that again must be local code. I have used them on all types of pipe and never heard a complaint.
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

You haven't done shit for plumbing if you don't even know what a wet vent is.
FU Look it up.

Like your mommy and grandfather did to produce you.

You're clueless. Great help.
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The wet vent is the one roofers use when they have to pee
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Right after they drop their empty beer can in it
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote to hisself:

Who? What? When?
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wrote:

Yes there are such terms. As I recall from my fading memory, a dry vent goes straight to the outside, while a wet vent may be plumbed through another drain.that has a dry vent.

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On Sat, 02 Jul 2005 13:08:57 GMT, "FDR"

OK, then what you are saying is that a vent that is being used as part of the drain for example a fixture on an upper floor of a building would be a wet vent, right?
Most homes that are two story of more place a toilet in the same location on the second floor as on the first. That way the same stack serves as the drain, for both levels, and vents the lower toilet at the same time, Then the pipe above the upper toilet that exits the roof would be considered the dry vent. I understand the principal but never heard those terms, Makes sense though.
Mark
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Sasha,

I guess I'm lucky. We built our own house last year (Washington State), and did all the foundation, framing, plumbing, electrical, etc. ourselves. We had at least 7-8 different inspectors over a 2 year period, and every single one of them was pleasant to deal with, helpful when I had questions, and usually commented on the excellent quality of our work. We'd call in an inspection and they always showed up the next morning. We passed every inspection without a single correction needed.
Our electrical inspector was a little apprehensive when he first showed up and realized we did the wiring ourselves. But once he saw our work met or exceeded all codes, he seemed very impressed and was more than happy to approve our work.
The closest thing to a "hurdle" was the health department. They didn't visit the site, but wanted me to draw up the plot plan in their office. They seemed concerned about the proximity of our well and septic system. Obviously my drawing was NOT to scale, we have more than the minimum distances, and the system had been inspected and approved twice already in the past several years. It only took a few minutes to straighten out and wasn't a big deal, but that was the closest thing to a problem we encountered.

Unless codes have changed, vent sizes ARE determined by fixture units, but at least one 3" vent is required to reduce the change of frost/snow closure.
In our house, I wanted to minimize the number of roof penetrations, so we just have the single 3" roof vent (to match our 3" main drain). I ran 2" vents from all fixtures in the house and tied them into the single roof vent (with a 3" trunk line running through the attic). The inspector approved it easily and said it was way more than I needed, but it accomplished the single roof vent I wanted.

Hmm, never heard that one before. Usually the concern is that the toilet is placed too far from a vent, which could lead to siphon and drainage problems. If I remember correctly, the toilet drain can run a maximum of 6' before it is vented (2" minimum vents for toilets). My 3" toilet drains run about 2 feet before a 2" vent heads off to the attic.

I don't know your situation, but I'm not sure if they are allowed in "concealed" locations? I could be wrong though, as they are the standard way of connecting no-hub cast iron piping.
I used one in our attic to connect our 3" PVC plumbing with a 3" ABS section to stick out the roof (didn't want a white pipe above the roof, and didn't have the vertical room for male/female adapters). I also used a couple in our crawlspace for our bathtubs and master shower, as it made installation and future maintenance easier.
Good luck!
Anthony
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Did you paint the ABS pipe? My understanding is that plastic pipes shouldn't be exposed outside. [Exception: those with UV inhibitors, like (I think) grey electrical plastic conduit.] For this reason I use a short length of copper DWV for any exterior vent.
To the OP, one thing my inspector told me was that rubber couplings with two individual metal clamps separated by exposed rubber are only approved for buried use. In exposed locations, indoors and out, the rubber couplings should have a continuous metal shield for the full length. Could this be what your inspector was complaining about?
Cheers, Wayne
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Wayne,

Nope, just the bare ABS above the roof.
I've heard the same thing about exposed plastic pipe (primarily PVC), but every house in our area (even million dollar homes) have the bare ABS above the roof. Only 2 feet or so is exposed to the sun, and doesn't have any water or anything causing pressure. I suppose it could deteriorate and crack if someone leaned on it 10 years from now, but I'm not real concerned. Thanks to the Fernco coupling, it's easily replaced if there's ever a problem.
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote:

It should be noted that plastic (pvc?) electric conduit comes in both standard and sunlight resistant kinds. Probably the sunlight specs of plumbing pvc could be found easily?
--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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