Plumber's putty as a sealant?

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I am going to install a vanity marble top with sink onto my vanity after I take off the old, naturally. I have lots of plumber's putty which i know i can use on the faucet drain, but could i also use it as a sealant to my vanity?
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I sure would not. Assuming what you're talking about is sealing around the edges where the basin meets the vanity, I would use a clear mold resistant silicone. It sets up. Plumbers putty remains soft, pliable and very sticky.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Until it dries out. Then it turns to powder.
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Novel,
You lost me at the start, what needs to be sealed? Is this where the marble top meets the wall?
Dave M.
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wrote:

off the old, naturally. I have lots of plumber's putty which i know i can use on the faucet drain, but could i also use it as a sealant to my vanity?
I think they sell specific caulking for this job. I would not use plumber's putty for this because I think it's too soft and would eventually ooze out. You could ask a Lowe's or HomeDepot what product they recommend.
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wrote:

take off the old, naturally. I have lots of plumber's putty which i know i can use on the faucet drain, but could i also use it as a sealant to my vanity?

top you are working with.
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 16:57:57 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

take off the old, naturally. I have lots of plumber's putty which i know i can use on the faucet drain, but could i also use it as a sealant to my vanity?

Of course if he knows that person.
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wrote:

take off the old, naturally. I have lots of plumber's putty which i know i can use on the faucet drain, but could i also use it as a sealant to my vanity?

DOES know - takes all the mystery out of the situation.
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 21:58:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

take off the old, naturally. I have lots of plumber's putty which i know i can use on the faucet drain, but could i also use it as a sealant to my vanity?

Well okay if the person buying thinks the person selling "knows". If it were me, I'd ask around including the person selling and some home improvement stores.
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Novel8 wrote:

Depends upon where you are going to put it and how developed your sense of esthetics is.
On boats, a "bedding compound" is frequently used. Its purpose is to provide perfect contact between two objects to prevent water intrusion. It is putty with some anti-fungal material. Putty is calcium carbonate (usually) and linseed oil.
I often use putty for various things. For example, under the hinge leafs on doors exposed to the elements; same for the lock & strike plates. I just roll out a bit in my hand, squeeze onto whatever and tighten down the screws; any excess squeezes out and is easily removed (I use a piece of hard wood sanded to a chisel edge).
Someone said it doesn't get hard. It does but it takes a while as the linseed oil is raw, not boiled.
I also sometimes use it to fudge a bit. I made a sink cabinet for my wife's laundry room, used vinyl on the top, edged with wood. There were a few slight gaps twixt vinyl and edging, a bit of putty rubbed in fixed that nicely.
--

dadiOH
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Novel8;2993987 Wrote: > I am going to install a vanity marble top with sink onto my vanity after > I take off the old, naturally. I have lots of plumber's putty which i > know i can use on the faucet drain, but could i also use it as a sealant > to my vanity?
I'm wanting to clarify a few points here.
Plumber's putty is NORMALLY used to seal between the lip and top of the counter top on a drop-in sink. I really don't know if the same is true for undermount sinks, or not.
Yes, most plumbers probably would use silicone caulk as the sealant under a drop-in kitchen sink, but I won't do that, and haven't in the 21 kitchen sinks in my building. The reason why is that silicone also works as a good adhesive, and should you ever want to remove that sink in future, having silicone holding it in place is just gonna make it more of a fight to remove. And, removing the silicone stuck to the counter top is very much more difficult than plumber's putty.
So, if it were me, if this is a drop-in sink, I'd definitely use plumber's putty.
Someone said that "putty" is simply clay mixed with linseed oil. That is correct. GLAZING putty, which is used on old windows is nothing more than linseed oil mixed with clay. Plumber's putty is a different kettle of fish because it doesn't harden the way glazing putty does. If you buy a tub of plumber's putty, the surface of it won't get hard when exposed to air the way glazing putty will. I really don't know the difference between glazing putty and plumber's putty, but if I had to guess, my guess would be that unlike the linseed oil used in glazing putty, plumber's putty uses a semi-drying oil.
Drying oils are those which dry to a solid when exposed to the oxygen in the air. Such oils include linseed oil, Tung oil, walnut oil, poppyseed oil, oiticia oil, safflower oil, Tall oil (which is a by-product of the pulp and paper industry) and some oils derived from fish.
Non-drying oils are those which don't react with oxygen to transform into a solid at all, and such oils would include crude oil, olive oil, and palm tree oil.
However, there are also "semi-drying" oils with transform from a liquid to a stiff liquid when exposed to the oxygen in the air, and such oils would include soy bean oil.
My guess, and it's only a guess, is that plumber's putty is clay mixed with a semi-drying oil, like soy bean oil. Old plumber's putty is stiff and breaks easily. But, it's not nearly as rigid as old glazing putty.
So, if this is a drop-in sink, yeah, go ahead and use plumber's putty.
--
nestork


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What do you do about the fact that it never hardens, is sticky and gray? I sure would not want it at the perimeter of my sink, wrong color and dirt attractant. White sink with gray line at the bottom? Makes no sense to me when clear silicone or similar caulks are available and even come in colors.
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 06:03:17 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I used plumbers putty to set my current sink. There's no gaps because it's virtually flush with the counter. Does take about 5 minutes of wipe down to eliminate the excess. But I can't see a putty line. Since the sink is a mid-grade SS, pretty sure I would bend and ruin the lip if I set it in silicone and had to take it out again. Silicone acts as an adhesive.
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wrote:

I've pulled plenty of things apart that used silicone and unless you use a lot of it, it's not hard at all to seperate. Silicone has give, the sink starts to lift, you put a putty knife under it, etc.
Anyone can use whatever they want. But there are plenty of pros out there using silicone.
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 08:57:52 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Yeah, sure dipshit. BTW, fuck you.
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 08:57:52 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Personally I think you are a gun crazed idiot but on this subject, I'll have to agree with you :( . Most plumbers and sinks I see now (top mounted) use silicone and I agree it's not that hard to remove unless you use a lot or perhaps a wrong type. Another concern is mold and I think the silicone will resist it much better where it makes contact with water.
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NestorK wrote:
"Plumber's putty is normally used to seal between the lip and top of the counter top on a drop-in sink."
' snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net[_2_ Wrote: > ;2995040']

Trader4:
You won't see a gray line.
On stainless steel drop in sinks, the lip is curved so as to be concave down. So, when you tighten the sink clamps, the perimeter of the lip will make contact with the counter top first. So, after you remove any excess putty on the counter that oozed out while you were tightening the sink clamps, there won't be any plumber's putty showing around the sink.
If you're sink isn't stainless steel, you can remove any excess plumber's putty by simply wiping down the perimeter of the sink with a rag or paper towel damp with mineral spirits. Or, remove the excess plumber's putty and caulk around the sink with silicone if the lip is thick enough.
But, you are correct in that both silicone and plumber's putty are used to seal around the perimeter of a drop-in sink.
--
nestork


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nestork wrote:

Plus mineral oils. ___________

Clay along with other minerals such as (primarily) calcium carbonate, talk, silica, etc. _______________

+1
--

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On Sat, 12 Jan 2013 08:13:16 +0000, nestork

This the only thing I disagree with. Always see plumbers putty recommended for setting a sink. Nice write-up. Never even thought about the types of oils used. Though I don't claim any expertise in putties/dopes, I'm pretty sure old-timers commonly coated steel/iron pipe with a type of simple plumber's putty made with drying oils. I took apart plenty of 40-60 year old fittings back in the '60's where it wasn't wiped clean on the outside, and it looked more like putty than a less viscous dope. Dried hard as a rock, inside and out. Pretty sure they used linseed oil an dopes and putties then. Late '60's was about the time they started using Teflon in dope, but they also had plenty of suitable non-Teflon dopes. Lots of advances in chemistry. Same with Permatex on the automotive side. They used to have something like #1, 2, 3 and a hi-tack, now they have so many products you have to think about it. Anyway, what old-time plumbers used is hard to determine, mostly because plumbers didn't keep journals.
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wrote:

The obvious lack of logic there noted.

That's what happens with pipe dope after decades. It doesn't mean that it was plumbers putty to begin with.

What old time plumbers used is largely irrelevant because there are better alternatives today. In my world for caulking around a sink in a vanity, that is silicone sealant.
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