Plumber cost?

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jim wrote:

You're kidding, right? $100 per foot? When I hooked up to the sewer line a 30 foot length of sewer pipe was needed and part of it was 8-10 feet deep compared to 3-4 feet normal for a water supply line. According to you the digging would be a minimum of $3000 or if real cheap about $1500. Thank god, I only paid a total of $600. Even well drillers don't charge $100 a foot here.
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"Peter A" wrote in message
<Snip>

I know you learned your lesson already, but this should have raised a red flag immediately (phone estimate).
Your chances are almost as good getting an estimate on Usenet. No reputable person can give an estimate without visually seeing what the job consists of. I'm involved with construction estimates, each one has a different element to deal with. From pipelayers to painters, without blueprints and spec sheets, you need to put a visual on it.
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My worst experiences have been with plumbers. Given the opportunity, I don't deal with individual plumbers anymore. I'll go with a corporate name.... at least I have someone up higher to bitch at.

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A plumber for $25 an hour!? Wow! In New York my cleaning lady makes $17.50 and hour and she's cheap! A New York Metro area plumber makes between $75 to $100 an hour - double that for work in New York City. I don't understand why if he gets a good deal on some pipe, he has some obligation to give you the same deal? He'd have to be some incredibly nice guy to do work for you for very litlle money and to scrounge up a good price on materials so you wouldn't have to pay what the materials should cost. Doesn't sound that realistic to me.

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Here in North Carolina, my daughter recently had a consultation meeting with a lawyer.... $50 for the first hour of consultation. After that, it was $150 per hour. My last plumber, who I won't hire again, charged me $175 to roto-root one line of my house. It took him (and his assistant in training) less than 45 minutes to do it. Needless to say, I won't hire him or his assistant again.
PS.... Is there some kind of advanced degree that plumbers get that makes them more technical and expensive than lawyers? My friend across the street swears that he's never met a plumber that wasn't drunk or working to get drunk. I apologize in advance to the honest plumbers that may be out there.
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Wayne, any idea of the costs he has to be able to show up at your place and spend an hour or two? If he carries his paid helper and drives his rather pricey truck/van with that few thousand dollar machine and many thousands more for all the tools and parts he needs, from his place to yours, should he not recover his costs of doing so? Would you if you were him or do you think he's mismanaging his business?
What about all the time he spent learning his 'trade' and his liability whether he knows what he's doing or not? What if he chewed a hole in your pipe, you expect him to take the cost of fixing it outta were? Yesterdays' wages? How about his previous profits? You do realize he's self employed and pays his and the employer's parts of FICA etc. right? That's on his helpers too. What about anything for retirement since he's both employer and employee? I could go on some more but.... the lawyer writes off his rent or lease payments, or more likely owns his building while it appreciates in value. He probably leases his office equipment while the plumber probably has a large expense if he leases his vehicle(s) but he can't lease his tools and special machines. The lawyer has E&O insurance and liability if you fall on his business property but he isn't going out to your place and doing anything close to causing your house tens of thousands of dollars in water or other damages like mold discovered three years later. That BTW, the plumber can no longer buy insurance to protect himself against; or so I think since my coverage has been deleted from my insurance coverage and all I do is install equipment on existing potable water line plumbing. So IMO, that's a bad analogy and it's really wrong as to what your plumber's charges have to be for him to stay in business; he doesn't work for hourly wages although he may charge labor rather than flat rate. There's a whole other world on the other side of this equation and it seems you have no factual clue as to what it's like from the other side.
Gary Quality Water Associates www.qualitywaterassociates.com Bulletin Board www.qualitywaterassociates.com/phpBB2/

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Quit your griping
He quoted the job, you accepted and he performed the service. It's called a CONTRACT.
His price was par for the job, not way over as some have suggested.
Most commercial plumbers make prevailing wages. Look their rate up for your locale.
Why would he work overtime for you and charge half? I'll bet you wouldn't work over for half your pay rate.
Maybe you neighbor truly does love him. Maybe he lays more pipe with your neighbor and gives a volume discount......

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