plausible using backyard oak to make something ?

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On 3/16/2011 11:40 PM, Harry K wrote:

My late grandmother resembled that remark. She WAY overplanted the yards on the small-lot house she owned, too close together and too close to house. (No old trees, other than the old fenceline by street. Subdivision was an old farm field.) Me and my brothers ended up ripping out a lot of trees and bushes over the years.
--
aem sends...

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Leave the tree alone and add a second story to the house. Ask a qualified arborist to estimate the value of the tree...you may be quite surprised. Losing the tree may in fact reduce the value of your property.
Joe
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robb wrote:

1. Cutting it down will likely diminish your property value more than an addition will increase it. I'd rework my addition ideas.
2. "White" oak (and "red" oak) tell nothing about the species of the tree as each color has many species in it and the characteristics of the species vary widely. I have around three dozen "white" oaks about the size (or larger) as yours on my property. They are live oaks - Quercus virginiana - and the wood is only good to burn; it splits, checks and twists as you wouldn't believe if you try to dry it. Doesn't burn real well either; hot but not pretty because there are precious few things in it to gas and make flames.
Trees like mine used to be good for ship building because the trees don't know the meaning of growing up...the limbs twist and flop around like an amnesiac, often bending down to the ground, and the ship builders could cut out curvy stuff.
They are messy too. They just finished dropping tons of leaves and millions and millions of acorns; they will start dropping blossoms soon. Those things end but the dropping of twigs never does. All of which means I have to blow off my courtyard bricks at least twice a week. They also drop *BIG* limbs from time to time. I'm talking limbs that weigh many tons...they split off the main trunk due to rot and/or weight...they get hit by lightning. Fortunately, neither I nor the house has ever been under one when it fell.
Despite their messiness I wouldn't cut down a single one.
3. You might get lumber out of it, depends on what it is. Ask a local sawmill.
--

dadiOH
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I've seen chainsaw mills that cut the trunk into slabs,then they get stacked,stickered and dried for about a year,then need to be planed down flat and to working thinkness. You can also hire people who own portable mills to cut up your tree into planks,they need to be stacked,stickered,and dried for about a year.They usually work for some percentage of the finished wood,or charge a fee.
Wood magazine also ran an article about using a shop bandsaw(a large one) to cut small,short sections of tree into planks that still need to be dried,planed flat and to thickness.
also,"green",undried wood is good for lathe turnings.
--
Jim Yanik
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Making lumber is something you can do yourself, but it is time consuming, labor intensive, and messy. On the other hand, it is grandly rewarding. Here is some info and pictures of some Burr Oak I did:
http://bullfire.net/Lumber/Lumber.html
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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 20:37:15 -0400, robb wrote:

Don't let the greenies find you! How dare you cut down a mega-CO2-to-oxygen converter for a remodel!
What you can make out of it depends on the equipment and skills you have. You can rough it and chain saw some nice barn wood type lumber and add it to your addition. You could make a porch swing. You could make a lot of nice things if this is cut properly. Just make sure you have a metal detector to make sure you don't cut into some nails.
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Michael Dobony wrote:

Around here, the lumber harvestors won't deal with urban trees, mostly because of the probability of nails, but also because its a lot tougher cutting down a tree surrounded by houses than one in a wood lot.
Oak does make excellent firewood.
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My father in law had some black walnut growing at a home he lived at. When the state bought the house to bring a road through he harvested the trees and made Grandfather clocks from the wood.He also made a nice oval table by taking a diagonal slice out of one of the trunks. He sanded it smoth with a floor sander.
Jimmie
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"robb" wrote in message

Thanks to all who responded and for the helpful replies.
Although i didn't mention it in OP.. We do *NOT* want to cut the tree we were told by the Builder/Contractor that the tree will not survive the nature of the remodel and the tree appears to have grown past it's expectancy anyways. They recommended removal.
I asked my question to make best of bad situation and to try and honor the tree we like by using the wood in the house (furniture, flooring, staircase, etc).
The problem is they built the house to close to the tree to begin with.
At the very least i plan to revisit the idea of saving it with Builder/Contractor push the point a little harder.
Looks like the time and effort to cut/store/dry/season wood is going to be problematic but doable.
Thanks for help responders. robb
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"robb" wrote in message

Ask advice of: (1) A cabinetmaker or antique repair shop in your vicinity. (2) Operator of a sawmill in your vicinity. Costs of transport (from your property to a user's) are the second factor likely to determine utility. The first factor is the particular species of timber and its dimensions (before and after felling.) It is common to discover theoretically beautiful and strong timber has no market value locally (although in another place it might be very valuable.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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It would make good barbecue wood, especially if mixed with a little mesquite and pecan. Bob-tx
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 10:03:31 -0500, "Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote:

We've got Red & White oaks in NY. I wouldn't want either near any BBQ. [good firewood-- but the smoke smells 'off' to me- maybe some folks like it]
What kind of oak do you use for BBQ in TX?
Jim
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I don't know about white oak, but I cut some red oak from my property in 1983. I had to wait until the mill's blade was due for overhaul; that is, where any "wire" in the logs would do the least damage to the teeth. (And people - they had a death from flying wire a few decades back).
After sawing, the oak was kilned.
I use it for wood woodworking and still have about 200-300 bd ft left.
I also used red oak for firewood. Lots of heat and it splits easy.
Gary
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