Plastic repair-Pet Safe

I have a watering bowl that has a plastic container that sits on top and fills the bowl as the level in the bowl goes down when pets drink. The plastic container has a small hole in the "top" (when it's upside down). I need to repair this and was thinking some type of epoxy.
Would all epoxies be Pet Safe? I was thinking yes since they cure to a solid and I think there would be little that would leach out into the water. Thought I'd check here though just in case. Any recommendations.
Also to be considered is that since the patch will be on the "top" of the container, the patch won't be in contact with water on a continuous basis, but just for a short time when it is filled.
Don't know what type of plastic it is - it was clear at one time but has yellowed with age.
Charles
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On Jan 23, 1:52 pm, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Charles Bishop) wrote:

I'd use clear 100% silicone caulk or even better, Lexcel, before I'd use epoxy. It will be fine for your needs and the critter(s) will not be harmed. Just let it cure fully before you let them use it.
R
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They sell aquarium-grade silicone caulk, which would be perfect for this application.
--
Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

The GE Silicone I caulk is FDA spec.
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Charles Bishop wrote:

They sell a plastic welder at harbor freight, or you can weld some plastics with a soldering iron and a piece of filler/patch. Hot glue and a patch might work if it won't be exposed to water pressure.
I would stay away from epoxies though; would you want to drink water that was in contact with potentially uncured epoxy amines or leachates? I sure as hell wouldn't.
Jon
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On Jan 23, 2:59 pm, "Jon Danniken"

That's really not much of a concern. Rinsing the patched jug in hot water a couple of times would probably make the epoxy as safe as the jug itself was initially, and the OP said the patch wouldn't be in contact with water for any more time than it took to fill the bottle - probably less than half a minute.
R
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