Plastic over windows to protect?

I have a smallish backyard, 90 x 60 feet. It is a bit tight for kids playing back there. Last summer one of the expensive insulated glass windows got broken. I'd like to put some sort of plastic panel, as a storm window, to help protect them. I don't open these windows and I don't need them as an emergency egress as there is a side window and an outside door in the room. The windows are about 40 inches square. What do I need and how should I go about installing. Thanks
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Simon wrote:

Make a frame, add the plastic panels and get some of the hardware from the hardware store to install them.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Plexiglas; good stuff but a mite expensive.

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Simon wrote:

You could put up window screens. They may not look as odd as a piece of plastic.
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Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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Go to plastics store and compare thin polycarbonate (Lexan) to Plexiglas. It is much stronger (ever try to shatter a CD) and you can use a thinner piece so the cost may not be a lot different.

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Jeff wrote:

If you try breaking a CD with your hands, it's like the CD just explodes.
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You can cut one with scissors. That's what I do with AOL CDs.
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Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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wrote:

I use 'em for target practice - good peripheral, nice sized center hole for 30 yards. Misses are easy to see.
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1) Look for a storm window kit. See if they have tempered glass. Tempered should handle most impacts well.
2) Acrylic plastic panel. Has many trade names such as Lucite and Plexiglas. It must go into a channeled frame. Channel must give some expansion room. Don't screw it direct to the window frame. Screws are a stress point and it may crack around the holes. You have to clean it with water (no Windex!) and a soft cotton cloth to keep it clear. Forget the thin acrylic at the hardware stores. You need 1/8" thick for your size.
3) Polycarbonate. Lexan is a trade name. It is the toughest of all, but it has a softer surface than acrylic and scratches easy. It will also haze in the sunlight and it is very expensive. Home Depot sells both acrylic and Lexan (sorry about the plug).
If your up to building frames, acrylic is probably your best bet. John
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If you go with polycarbonate, there are UV resistant versions specifically made for use in applications like this. One side is treated and goes to the outside.
Mike
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