Plastic Gas Tank Spigot Cut With Razor Knife

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Doug Miller writes:

You're worked a trivial disagreement into vicious, bilious contempt.
You must lead a miserable real life.
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You know, *I'm* not the one getting all worked up here...
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

If you say so. Cold contempt is unwholesome.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

might work, might not. Will only work if it's a thermoset plastic.

I would be concerned that the glue would not actually stick to the gas tank and you'd end up with a leak between the tank and the glue.

Teflon tape is not a sealer; it's used on pipe threads as a lubricant to allow the pipe fittings to be tightened more securely for a better seal. It does not provide any sealing itself. Probably plain old electrical tape would work better, although again, I'd be concerned about the gasoline dissolving the adhesive and starting another leak.

How about cutting the nipple off entirely, finding an appropriately sized brass fitting, and threading it into the tank with some Permatex No. 2 or similar to seal the threads? Or if the cut into the plastic nipple is not deep, just cover the nipple with a thin coat of Permatex and reinstall the hose? (obviously this will permanently glue the hose to the tank, making future disassembly problematic.)
good luck,
nate
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N8N wrote:

Forgot to mention, if you don't feel like messing with it, have you tried to get a price on a replacement gas tank? It might be surprisingly inexpensive. I was pleasantly surprised the other day when I priced out some replacement parts for some Andersen windows, under $60 for a casement window actuator, and a counterbalance and latch for a double-hung.
nate
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On 21 Nov 2006 20:37:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

No. You'll just get a bigger hole.

I very much doubt it. Won't stick.

No.
I'm sure. I cam accoss plastic epoxy in a double syringe, at ACE hardware. Haven't used it yet. Should be great.
PC-11 specifically says it doesn't stick to polyethylene, if that's what you have, but PC-7 doesn't say that.
I would try JB-weld because Steve recommended it, but if it doesn't work well you can scrape it off later. It wil come off in one piece.
I would have said the same thing about 5-minute epoxy, like from Devcon, but others have said they won't stick. Hmmm. It didn't stick to my motorcycle coil which is covered in some sort of plastic.
You might also try GE silicone. Available in 2 oz tubes at autoparts stores, in black. Again if it doesn't work you can srape it off. Also available in caulking gun size tubes for far less money per ounce, and probably won't dry out for months (or years?) if you seal it well. Mine came with a cap but I used plastic electric tape wound tight to go over the nozzle and cap.
PC-7 is worth buying even if you think you are only going to use it this once. in the two 2 or 4 oz. cans. People have raved here for quite a while about JB-welld, so I bougth some and tried it. And although it wasn't enough for one particular job, that probably was not its fault. It has the advantgage of being very creamy and I'm sure dries with a nice appearance (although in my case, the glue was hidden from view.
PC-7 is thick and comparitively hard to work ith, but that is all overcome by wetting one's finger and smoothing things out.
PC-7 is FANTASTIC. IT STICKS TO GLASS, FOR GOSH SAKE.
You can APPLY IT UNDERWATER, OR TO A LEAKING DRAIN WITH A LEAKING FAUCET ABOVE IT, AND it will be waterproof when it dries.
stick something like a woooden match or a stick in the "spigot?" for he gas, and then work in the pc-7, making sure it doesn't get too big for the tube that goes on it. That it's all or mostly within the slit.
Smooth it with a spit-wet finger, but use each of your fingers, and only once. That's why God gave us 10 (the thumbs don't seem to work well of rhtis.. Or at least don't put your glue-dirty finger in your mouth. In the last 4 months I've learned to pour my spit on it without touching my finger to my mouth. I doubt if the stuff I used to taste on rare occasions would kill me, but it couldn't do me any good.
pc-7 takes a full 24 hours to dry, set, completely. That's if you mix it well. If you don't, I don't think it ever sets. I use ttwo screwdrivers, one for each can, then mix it with one of them. Before it sets, it wipes off the screwdrivers with a paper towell, and will wash off with plain water too. Although I don't do that in a sink because I don't want it to go down the drain.
Even when smoo

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wrote:

If you try hot glue, heat the plastic first with a heat gun or hair dryer. If it's hat already, the hot glue sticks better.

Once you try silicone, you will likely have problems getting anything to stick.
Bob
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Yes, but... you can forget about anything ever sticking to it again after you've put silicone on it.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Wed, 22 Nov 2006 20:58:27 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Hadn't noticed this. I'll bear it in mind.
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I contacted the local lawn mower repair shop & they have a replacement spigot just for this situation. You cut off the old plastic spigot, drill a hole & insert a replacement spigot that screws tight to the tank bottom.
In our case we were able to just push the new gas line up tight to the bottom of the tank and use two clamps to hold it in place. No leaks!!!
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Yes there is a glue (sealant) that is made for such fixes. It will stick to plastic or what ever and will not dissolve with gas. I have used in plenty of times on leaky gas tanks. Metal and plastic. This spring I sealed a Briggs and Stratton mower, plastic gas tank that was leaking badly at a join. I used this mower all summer with no leaks. The stuff is called "Seal All" and can be bought at hardware stores or automotive parts stores. Several thin coats are better than one thick one. Allow to dry between coats.

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Another possibility would be to drill out the nipple and use some type of a "weldless" fitting in the hole. It would probably use a gasket and screw tightening to form a seal.
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hmm, so you fix this cheap little tank and park the lawnmower in your garage and it leaks, catches fire ,the house burns down, the kids are killed and you saved what 10-20 dollars? Replace the tank! Eric
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