Plastic gas tank

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I have a white plastic gas tank on a snowblower that cracked, will any glue, sealer, bond, maybe an automotove silicone sealer? My "quality" John Deer gas tank was attached with a simple Pipe Clamp the type you tighten with a screwdriver. I have heard nothing bonds to this type of white plastic.
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Replace it.
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Bert Byfield wrote:

I agree. You might check with manufacturer. Repair is not a good idea. I had one on a Lawnboy replaced after they extended warranty after discovering defect.
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You heard right. Buy a new tank.
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wrote:

That HDP plastic has VERY low surface energy. It will behave as if it is impregnated with oil. If you find someting that will adhere to a surface covered with oil, you can glue it. Otherwise, replacement is mandatory.
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On Nov 15, 8:27am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

.
And its a 2 stroke so its totaly oiled up.
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Aside from replacement as the best option---I repaired a plastic lawn mower tank that was cracked and leaking by using epoxy. The epoxy that I used was the solid ribbon type and you mixed two colors together. It's been two seasons and the repair has held up. MLD
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I trust you store this machine outside and away from all buildings...
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wrote:

Why? Epoxy glues are labeled specifically for use as sealants for plastic gasoline containers. For example: http://www.pcepoxy.com/pastepoxies/pastesuper.asp
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...
The spec sheet mentions gas resistance and use on gas tanks but I missed the reference to "plastic gasoline containers".
My vote goes with the rest of the guys who said "replace", repair is possible but HDPE is nearly impossible to adhere to.
cheers Bob
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

And Protective Coating (manufacturer of the pcepoxy brand) makes great products even though they are an evil family owned business.
Knowledgeable people answer the phone and they are very interested in making quality products.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Even if the repair works, there may be another part of the tank getting ready to fail. Plastics are very valuable engineering materials when properly used but often designers do not test their products thoroughly.
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Right there on their site it states that their product will not bond to Polyethylene. Did you not notice?
TDD
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wrote:

That link specifiacally states that it will NOT stick to polyethelene, which is what Ransley's gas tank is made out of. Here is the exact quote from that website:
***Note: PC-Super Epoxy will not bond to wax paper, Teflon, Polyethylene, and some other plastics. There are hundreds of plastics in thousands of combination. Test a small area when in doubt.
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This is why ***Note: PC-Super Epoxy will not bond to wax paper, Teflon, Polyethylene, and some other plastics. There are hundreds of plastics in thousands of combination. Test a small area when in doubt.
It may work on some tanks of some plastics, but not on very many as the ones on small engines often are polyethylene or a compound containing it.
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Why?? If the repair fails the gas leak is obvious--how do you think I discovered the leak in the first place. Add one more year to the repair as I'm now completing the third season since I repaired the tank. Getting a replacement tank wasn't a good option, no having to get rid of the mower as a result Too bad you didn't have better advice to offer instead of looking down your nose. MLD
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MLD wrote:

Laconic, maybe, but he is right. After I had to replace my Lawnboy tank, I never store it full anymore. They had recommended that when they gave out their extended warranty.
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Frank wrote: ...

What difference unless it's completely empty other than reducing the area that a crack could occur that would leak during storage does it make?
I'm w/ the "if the repair works, it works" camp. If it fails during storage, it's no different than if the initial crack begins leaking during storage.
Not sure about the particular tank/plastic in question, but I've had some success w/ epoxy on the rougher-textured white plastic which is very similar in appearance anyway on the stock tank floats. Haven't had need for it to try on a gas tank, but what's lost w/ the experiment--a quarter worth of epoxy and a few days experiment, maybe?
I have successfully "welded" a filler neck crack on a heavier plastic diesel tank on the little 955 Deere tractor w/ an old-style heat-'em up soldering iron (the heat the iron in the blowtorch then apply it to the joint type). That's lasted, oh, about five years so far, but, of course it's not a bond.
If all else failed, I'd not be above at least trying such an experiment -- if it leaks anyway, a failure is still only an new tank... :)
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not if the unit is stored in say a garage, and the gasoline vapors cause a explosion.
i never store gasoline in my home, that stuffs always in my shed, 50 feet from our home......
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So what do you do if you have a lawnmower, need to store gasoline (I use a red metal tank (made for gasoline, I think) for it), and you DO NOT have a separate shed?
(people store cars in their garages, though)
Thanks,
David
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