Plaster repair

I had a window unit airconditioner that leaked and ruined the plaster underneath the windowledge and wall. What do you suggest is the best way to repair this damage?
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In what way is it damaged? Is the plaster coming off in chunks, or getting ready to? Does it seem to have separated from the lath (the wood behind the plaster)? You can sometimes see this, because the plaster bulges, or you can press gently and see if there seems to be space behind the plaster.
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The plaster has come off the underface of the window and about half way to the floor. It came off after it dried in chunks. I peeled off what would and there is just wall wood there. I was considering trying to plaster it myself but then I saw something that said to use drywall and cut it to fit. What do you think? Thanks

the
can
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It all depends. Sorry. :)
1) Although I've seen small drywall scraps for sale at Home Depot, you may have to buy a 4x8 sheet of it. I don't recall the prices, but it's certainly within the "Oh well - I have no choice" range. If you can get it home without breaking it, I'd use this method to patch the area.
2) The other issue with drywall is that you might not be able to get it in a thickness that matches that of the surrounding plaster. Then, it becomes a big production trying to make it work, and plaster suddenly seems like a good idea.
3) If you're looking at the lath under the plaster, that's a lot of thickness to cover. The plaster should be built up in layers and allowed to dry completely. Depending on temperature & humidity, this can take a week in some cases. Helping it with a fan makes it dry too fast and will cause cracking. But, using plaster will be the cheapest method in the end, and provides the best opportunity for matching the thickness & texture of the surrounding area.

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Please keep in mind that plaster does not dry. It sets up like concrete and mortar, and I think it sets best when sprayed with water once in a while for a day or so. I use the Gypsum plaster for a rough coat; it gives a lot of time for application. Then I use the Diamond white (?) for the finish coat. Also spraying the surfaces before each coat works to keep the plaster from loosing its moisture.
Please, don't use the plaster of paris stuff you can sometimes get in a hardware store. It is only good for children's hand prints. (Just my opinion -- I don't really know what else it is good for.)
Contrary to every recommendation I've seen, painting with primer and finish can be done as soon as two or three days, i.e., after the plaster is dry (and set, of course). I usually wait a little longer while doing other work, after plastering, before painting, but I've never seen any problems when a good primer followed by finish paint is used.
Drywall mud DOES DRY, versus setting. And the normal stuff can be "melted" with water. It is NOT good to spray mud after it is finished.
These are just my experiences; not those of a professional plasterer. --Phil
Doug Kanter wrote:

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Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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Hang on there, Phil! Earlier, you said it doesn't dry, but this paragraph says "after the plaster is dry". Whattyou...some kinda wise guy?
Onward: I've had large areas of plaster where the center was darker, and cooler to the touch than the outer area for a few days. Dry....set....whatever....it clearly wasn't ready to be painted yet. Like paint and cooking, you can't always count on anything but your own observations (if any) to know when to go to the next step.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

You even copied my full quote, but did you read the part, "(and set, of course)"? What you share is what I've also observed, the color change and dampness change as the plaster cures. "Cures", there is a new word for drying and setting!! :-)
Sometimes I wonder if the old plasters and paints of 50 years ago required the long times between plastering and painting. It has not seemed necessary to me. --Phil
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Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
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I don't know, either. Last time I did it was around 1990, using some stuff that came in a box with a bag inside, provided by a great hardware store that's since vanished. It seemed like inviting trouble to put it on in thick layers, so I filled 1/2" problem areas about 1/8" at a time. It took forever, but it's still standing.
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actually on the bottom of the a.c. unit there a hole that could be clog with sedatives, this hole should drain the water outside, but since it clog this why its leaking inside the window it has no place to go.....

the
can
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LOL :) Sedatives, I think you meant sediment.
Don't drink the water with sedatives, you will get very sleepy.
The point is make sure the reason for the damaged wall is fixed too
If the wall is likely to see water again, go with a really tough fix. Use cement board instead of wallboard and use FixAll instead of plaster. The wall will be like stone when you are done but can still be drilled. Cement board comes in smaller and thinner sizes than wallboard giving even more options.
With this treatment, you could tile with no further prep.

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