plaster of paris

Hello good usenetians,
I bid you peace from the high desert of New Mexico. At lutherhaven, we have plaster of paris on the walls, and it's not something I have much experience with.
It's like many such substances that start gooey and dry hard. Can you paint it? Would you want to?
Could you do a full-on oil-painting on it?
What's your experience with it?
Thx for your comment.
--
Twain

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Look up the Sistine Chapel, perhaps. Most of the wall mural stuff I have seen uses acrylic paints. Paint/prime first, however. You paint plaster walls with latex paint. Acrylic artist's paints are essentially the same stuff, but with more pigment.
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On 06/12/2012 06:18 AM, deadgoose wrote:

If you're gonna put in on flat and go over with it latex, why on god's green earth not go lightweight joint compound?
Are there more exotic paints and finishes that would really only work on plaster of paris as opposed to ordinary drywall and joint compound? For example, how would acrylic look on ordinary walls?
--
Cal

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From MULTIPLE bad experiences of latex over joint compound, I'd be leery of that combination: 1. inside home, sprayed cleaner on wall to watch latex paint practically 'slide' off! and fold down along surface 2. inside garage, spayed water on concrete, then to clean 'splatters' off wall accidently hit wall too strong and removed the latex off the joint compound - looked like cottage cheese finish afterwards.little broken pieces of latex paint everywhere. Paint should adhere better than that. Joint compound - american made, paint Dunn-Edwards.
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Robert Macy wrote:

Paint adheres to primer, primer adheres to walls. Neither paint nor primer adhere to sanding dust. (Well, it does, but the dust doesn't adhere to the wall.) Are you sure the walls were dust free when primed/painted?
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Absolutely a possibility.
What is a good way to remove that fine layer of dust on drywall before painting?
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On Thu, 14 Jun 2012 12:31:17 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

Vacuum cleaner then a damp sponge.
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On 06/14/2012 05:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

In spaces this large and without occupants, I use a leaf blower.
Please think twice before doing that where some lives.
--
Cal


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wrote:

Better wear a respirator, too.
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On Jun 14, 4:32pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

As a test, I did that. let dry for a few days and simply 'brush' against the surface and your clothes have dusty white streaks asthough you NEVER cleaned it! Just has something to do with that sanding. Maybe more water next time.
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On Sun, 17 Jun 2012 08:24:40 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

Is the paint chalking? If so, paint over it. Not the ideal thing but there isn't much else that can be done.
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wrote:

As a test, I did that. let dry for a few days and simply 'brush' against the surface and your clothes have dusty white streaks asthough you NEVER cleaned it! Just has something to do with that sanding. Maybe more water next time.
After building our new house a few years ago, the builder told me that the "wipedown" process consisted of a shop vac for the major dust and other leftovers including nails and bits of wire, then a damp cloth to get most of the dust and, finally, a going over with a tack cloth. I think the tack cloth is sticky and specially designed for getting rid of residual dust.
Tomsic
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YES! costly but that would get that last bit of pesky dust off. I know it is possible to paint over the joint compound because many places it holds. but it's like each member of the crew didn't do the process the same, and ....
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Personally, I don't like plaster of paris because it sets up HARD, difficult to sand and work with, however, it is used in churches for statuary. My mother used to be an artist and repaired/repainted MANY damaged statuary. She would 'add' plaster of paris where something had been seriously broken off to smooth the surfaces, then would paint with OIL based paints, like the oil paint used on canvas. I remember once something about a reaction she had to peanut oil bases in some of the colors.
Paint a statue? she did not simply color the statue. She would enhance its look by darkening some areas and lightening protroduing areas, thus giving the impression of increased depth and drama. I remember her shifting the colors down into darkened areas and 'washing' out the colors on highlighted areas. Took her months to do a little 3 foot statue. I still have not found the paint she used for gilt. The gold looked real and the closest I've found has been to use gold leaf, and that's usually simulated gold leaf today.
I prefer to work on joint compaound. It stays workable.But, has its limitations.
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On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 06:42:11 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

works pretty good for patching old plaster. Plaster of paris sets FAST and heats
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On 6/12/2012 1:52 AM, Twain Benson wrote:

Google "venetian plaster" and "fresco"....v.p. has been very popular, with quicky products sold at home stores. Old version involves finishing off with wax. Fresco is painting on wet plaster, which would not work with oil paint. You would need a primer (after adequate curing) in order to put oil paint on plaster....never done any of these. I painted a plaster lamp base (or two or three) years and years ago...start with a primer of diluted Elmer's glue and paint with acryllic paints. E.G. is made of same stuff...can't recall the chemical name...used in fine art to glue canvas to boards for oil paintings.
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