Plaster crack repairs: feathering

I've read a lot of articles on patching the cracks in our plaster walls so I know the basic steps. So far, I've cut out the cracks and filled them with drywall joint compound (the 40-minute mix from HD), and tried my hand at taping and applying another layer. This has been relatively easy. But I now see that the real test will be in how well I can apply another layer and "feather" the edges.
I was wondering if anyone here can give me some tips on how to do a good job on feathering. I have a 4", 6", and 10" drywall knife, mud tray, etc.
TIA
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jagerEd wrote:

The key is a few extra light coats is a better way to go than globbed on heavy ones that aren't flush with the existing wall and may develop cracks.
Use the 6" for the next 'light' coat. Very lightly sand using 120 grit drywall sandpaper when the coat is dry. Followed by the 10" knife w/ the same light sanding. Not a biggee if you get just a little heavy, or end up with a ridge or goober here'n there because you can sand that out easily. Some mud companies "Hamiltons" for instance, make different types of compound for pros.. From hard (for taping) to soft for finishing. For texturing I use the taping mud as it's harder when it dries after application. But All-Purpose should be all you need.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<< I was wondering if anyone here can give me some tips on how to do a good job on feathering. I have a 4", 6", and 10" drywall knife, mud tray, etc. >>
All the previous tips are right on the mark. Let me add one more essential item, namely low angle lighting. If you can light your working surface nearly parallel (without the glare in your eyes, naturally) then all the little flaws will be highlighted. If you do the job to minimize these flaws, the wall will appear almost dead flat in normal room light. Makes an amazing difference and the job goes way faster. Good luck.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks, Joe!
Ed
"> All the previous tips are right on the mark. Let me add one moreessential

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks. Let me ask for a few clarifications:

What do you mean "as far as you can reach?" As far as I can reach along the length of the tape?

Where will this excess mud be?

The tape is only 2" wide, so I don't quite understand this caution.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 21:29:03 GMT, "jagerEd"

You've got the right tools. Patch, dry, smooth, and repeat. Look at your patchwork using a troublelight held against the wall to sand out all the irregularities. Gradually move to a finer sandpaper and large putty knife. Use a latex primer. Sanding does make a mess so use drop cloths or plastic sheets to help with the cleanup.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Does someone want to say something about mud consistency? I've been mixing it with a consistancy of peanut butter for the initial layers, but was wondering if a little thinner would be better for finishing layers.
TIA
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.