plan to patch a textured ceiling?


I'm trying to repair an 8" circle cut out of a textured ceiling in our kitchen. I've been testing with joint compound to try and reproduce the texture. Dragging a wire brush to reproduce the random swirls that are in the original then dabbing the compound with a dry brush gives a pretty good pattern. The difference looks like the original had something in the paint to give it the texture. What I do with a brush leaves little peaks in the compound. Close but not the same. I tried mixing sand in the compound but it looked worse. Something coarser than the fine sand I used might work? I foolishly tried kitty litter. It was about the right size but the absorbency just made it turn to a blob of mud.
I haven't tried buying textured paint yet. I see different types of spray on texture at HD. I may experiment a little with that. Do they sell paint with something in it that gives it a texture? My guess is there are many variations and matching what was used on my ceiling may be a problem. Still It may be closer than my compound attempt?
My plan is to try and patch the hole. simulate the texture as best I can. Then because I most likely wont get a perfect match I was thinking I could then go over the whole ceiling with a textured paint? This would hopefully blend with the original texture and the patch texture making the patch less obvious.. Like I said, I've never used texture paint so I don't know if this plan is feasible? Is it ok to put one kind of texture paint over a preexisting texture? I would test in a closet first...
Thanks if you can offer any advice???
I don't want to sheet rock and put up a new ceiling. I'll live with the patch before I go to that trouble! I just want to make it look as good as possible,,
Steve
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I just did this in my living room. The existing texture looked like it was brushed with a whisk broom into swirls and then flattened down a bit.
There was a 10 foot area that still showed some indication that a wall had been removed and not well patched.
They sell a paint that is like thick paint or thin spackle for texturing.
I had a lot of trouble matching what was up there but I'd call my effort a success. It took many tries.
I tried sand paint, that didn't work at all. I think it really depends on what you are trying to match.
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THANKS DAN! we are about to remove a wall and will be faced with the same problem.
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writes:

you might find one of those is what was used originally. I used a loop-style cover to patch a stucco-style wall, and it worked really well.
TMcLone
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