Placing Molding Seams?

My new kitchen has 2 sets of molding for the wall cabinets...a 7" vertical board to cover most of the space between the top of the cab and the ceiling, and crown molding on top of that. One wall is about 12' long and the molding comes in 8' lengths. Since its stained cherry with different grain patterns and variation in color, a visible seam is inevitable.
I've already installed the vertical boards and decided to put the miter joint in the center of the wall..so I have 2 6' pieces. The seam is NOT lined up with a cab door or frame line. The question is where to put the crowm molding. If I put it in the same way, I'll have an obviously long vertical line. Should I put the 8' crown in the middle of the wall and then 2 2' sections on either end? I'll have 2 joints but that will break up the vertical lines.
What do pros usually do with long walls??
Thanks!
--Jeff
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I would probably have used an 8' piece for each layer starting from opposite ends so that the seams would be offset by 4'. You can't do that now, but using a full piece would offset the seam by 2' which should be fine.
R
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I'm not sure what you mean. The vertical boards are now 6/6. After hitting "send", I realized that another option for the crown molding would be 4/4/4 rather than 2/8/2. Is that what you meant??
--Jeff

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I'm not sure what you mean. The vertical boards are now 6/6. After hitting "send", I realized that another option for the crown molding would be 4/4/4 rather than 2/8/2. Is that what you meant??
Fewer seams are better. Cut the joint/seam at a 45 degree angle so that if the joint open up a bit it will not be an open hole. Also cut the 45 so that you do not look down into the joint at that 45 degree position. Basically have the joint point away from the normal viewing angle.
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No. Why would you want two seams when one will do? Use an 8' piece and a 4' piece - that will offset the seam between the different trim pieces 2'.
R
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It might be simpler to pre-assemble the pieces. Are you sure that they only come in 8 foot lengths, most moulding suppliers have long lengths available simply because the pros don't want to have joints.
If you join them in the shop or at least before you install them, you can cut them at a 45 degree angle, use biscuits, and clamp them straight with no visible misalignment. I have also glued a piece of 1/4 inch plywood to the back to reinforce the joint. It won't be hard to install a 12 foot piece, I have installed some 18 foot lengths by myself without problems. Done this way you will have the least visible joint possible.

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