Pitting of water heat flex connectors

I have a theory about...
I've replaced a number of those corrugated flexible copper pipes used to connect the hot and cold on water heaters, and have noticed that often the leak will be in a pit hole very close to the end where they hook on to the nipple of the water heater or coming from the house piping.
My theory is that the plastic bushing used at the end of the corrugated pipe stops electric flow thru the pipe system, and so the charge jumps the gap by passing thru the water - then creates a pit where it re-enters the copper piping.
Baloney, or brilliant?
Jim
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On Sat, 06 Jun 2009 12:36:15 -0700, Jim

My solution:
Buy braided rubber lines ( for hot water) as they have brass connections. Easy to install and forget using the copper lines.
After years of use, there are no leaks, corrosions or any signs of failure.
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whats wrong with regular copper lines? takes a little longer but much better job
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wrote:

Nothing wrong with copper, if you feel like working with it. I just used the braided rubber hose, twisted it a bit and then connected.
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bob haller wrote:

The biggest problem is that it takes a little longer. And copper is not very flexible which might be of concern in earthquake-prone areas. And, with copper, you need a greater variety of tools and more skill than "Does you hand fit a wrench?"
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Jim,
All water heaters have electrolysis with copper plumbing. The tank is steel and where it connects to copper you have electron flow. That's why you should install a dielectric nipple between the two. Years ago they used dielectric unions, but the nipple gets you about 3" of separation.
Also, copper can wear whenever there's excessive swirling going on. Plumbers are busy these days replacing copper in 50-year old buildings, expecially near 90 degree fittings. That's where you find the most swirl. It's worse if the plumber used too much solder and there's a bead of it inside the fitting--makes the swirl even worse.
Turns out copper piping isn't the wonder material everyone thought it was. It's still better than galvanized though. And who knows when we'll start seeing problems with Cpvc.
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On Sat, 06 Jun 2009 20:28:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@meister.com wrote:

Ooooohhhhhhhhhhh..............
A 3 inch NIPPLE.
That sounds exciting !!!!! (breathing heavy).
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Check the PH of your water.
Replace the corrugated copper lines with corrugated STAINLESS STEEL lines. No galvanic effect and no dielectric union needed.
http://www.falconstainless.com /
Braided rubber lines are a flood waiting to happen.
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On Sat, 6 Jun 2009 19:45:00 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'll consider SS lines next time.
Right now there is a race between my braided rubber lines and the WH. My odds are the WH fails first.
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