Pissed off at th thermostat

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Ignoramus28269 wrote:

A. How long was the original battery in? B. You could change the battery at the start of each heating season.
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Ignoramus28269 wrote:

Turn off the water, gas, and electricity before you leave, doofus.
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JerryMouse wrote:

If you're going to shut off the heat, the pipes should be drained.
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Is there an assurance that water will drain from all nooks of pipes, etc?
No.
For example.
I have a refrigerator with water cooler. Will water drain from there? No.
The proposed solution will not work.
i
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Ignoramus3686 wrote:

Draining the pipes before shutting off the heat in northern climates is pretty standard. If there are some things in need of individual attention, deal with them.
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Well, obviously, if I wanted to shut off the heat for an extended period of time, I would drain pipes and whatever else I could think of. My concern is, rather, that even with such effort, something would be left forgotten and then water would freeze there.
i
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not likeky , air space will keep it from freezing but IGNORAMUS says it all MMR
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Install an old electromechanical (bimetallic strip) thermostat in hidden location, such as inside an interior closet, and wire it in PARALLEL with existing thermostat. Set it to 55 degrees.
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i like that suggestion...
i
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Two things I do as I turn my clocks ahead and back, change the batteries in my smoke detector, and in my Thermostat. The cost is minimal, the safety factor isn't.
Dave
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Twice a year seems like overkill. I change all the smoke detector and clock backup batteries between xmas & new years. Just yesterday to be exact. My thermostat doesn't have a battery. 12 9v block batteries. 2 six packs from Sams.
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Rich Greenberg wrote:

Manufactures usually start off with a recommendation to freguently test critical battery operated devices and to change batteries in other equipment when it starts to operate poorly (duh). Then they jackup the recommendation to include more frequent testing or to changing the batteries at some arbitrary fixed interval. That usually progresses to a recommendation to change batteries at an even more frequent level to help sales and avoid any chance of customer problems.
Your change frequency depends on the type batteries you use. Regular, heavy duty, or the energizer type. Appliance manufactures have to assume the lowest common denominator, which is the regular battery, to avoid customer complaint and law suits. For critical use, I think you should use only the energizer type batteries, and you waste resources if you change them as if they were regular batteries. The logical thing to do is test how long the batteries will last in that appliance by marking the date and then seeing when they fail, because appliances vary in their power requirements. After that, change them in response to your tests.
How often do you change your razor blade, windshield wipers, headlights, brake linings, water heater, electric stove elements, or whatever? Would you recommend that people change them on a specific time interval or when they wear to an unacceptable performance? Oh, I didn't include tires because manufactures are not suggesting that you change tires on the basis of length not on the basis of use. Yep, I expect my tires that are mostly in a garage run at less than 70 percent of speed rating at temperatures that are fairly low will deteriorate just a fast as tires left in the sun subject to high humidity and high temperatures, and often run near maximum speed ratings. Give me a break!
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

<snip>
You can also take them out of the critical components early and reuse them for portable radios, toys, etc until they die.
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It may seem like overkill, but I never have to worry about a dead battery
Dave
wrote:

in
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6507
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