Pipe repair in cramped space


I have a 3/4" Cu pipe carrying return water in my baseboard heating system. It is install in a channel in the slab floor. I have exposed about 4" of length and am pondering sawing the pipe. But there is no room to sand it all the way around. There is only about 1/2" of space.
Can anyone tell me how to get the pipe prepared for soldering? TIA
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Stubby wrote:

Not nearly enough info, but you could make a loop of "sandpaper" out of maybe a 2" wide strip. Form the loop so that it looks like a "U" and slip one end under the pipe. Work the sandpaper up and down.
If not that, then you'll have to make a better picture of what you're doing.
Jim
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Thanks. The loop will do the far side just fine, but I'm worried about the top and close sides. I'm a fanatic about proper preparation before soldering!
Speedy Jim wrote:

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Stubby wrote:

Instead of a 2" strip, try a 1" strip and loop it around 360 degrees and go back and forth slowly. Should clean it sufficiently.
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I think 1" is the standard width for plumber's emory cloth. I think what you are saying is that I should expect to spend a lot of time.
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snipped-for-privacy@alum.mit.edu says...

No, just loop the Emery cloth around the pipe and turn it. ou should be able to do this with 1/16" space. The issue is how to heat it without torching the place. The carbon-fiber pads work, th9ugh not as well as asbestos. You might try putting so aluminum flashing behind carbon fiber pads.
--
Keith

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Probably why yours don't leak at the onset or a week/month(s) later.
Sounds like a quick digital pic of your situation will get you some useful input. Pic=1k words. Upload it here http://tinypic.comand post the link it gives you.
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Al Bundy wrote:

Good suggestion, Al. I'll try to do that later on today. My leak wasn't caused by a poor solder joint -- I actually failed to solder a coupler in a long run. It was just stuck together and drips about one or two drops a day. I'm toying with the idea a trying to solder it in place after draining the run, but I doubt there is any flux still in the joint. It's probably best to cut out a section and install a pair of repair couplers, all properly prepared.
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Hear a possibility would not hurt to try might save you a lot of work Go buy a piece of 3/4" copper tube the outside diameter is 3/4" should fit inside the 3/4 pipe. Basically your making an inside coupling. I don't think that will effect your return flow.
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Stubby,
Loop your emery cloth around the pipe. You should be able to easily polish about 1/2 (the bottom and some of the sides) the cylinder with the loop held straight up and down. Now move the loop out of the vertical and you should be able to polish more of one side. Repeat by moving the loop appropriately until the sides are on pretty good shape. A finger or a Popsicle stick can supply the pressure to shine up the top.
Dave M.
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After reading more of your post a picture would help. But you might also try heating the pipe ( after drained) then applying flux while hot then re-solider the joint, I've fixed a lot of leaks that way.
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