Ping Don Klipstein

Don, I'm trying to determine the difference in heat given off by a 100 watt BR-40 reflector flood, compared to a 100 watt BR-40 halogen reflector flood. Typically these lamps are rated in voltage, wattage, and lumens, but nothing tells me how much heat is given off.
Thanks for any help, Roy
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There is no differance in the heat given off by light bulbs for the same wattage. All the power is converted to heat. What little power in the actual light is converted to heat when it hits something in the room. Maybe a few photons escape by the windows, but not enough to make it noticable. If ballasts are used, their heat must also be factored in.
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On 8/1/2011 6:14 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

puts out 1190 lumens, and the other is a rough service which puts out 800 lumens, you're saying they both put out the same amount of heat?
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If they both actually draw 75 watts from the power source, they will put out the same amount of heat.
The amount of lumens tell how efficient they are at converting electrical imagery to light.
If you put them both in the same room, the one with the most lumens will be brighter. Put them both in the same size box, and the two boxes will heat up the same.
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On 8/1/2011 6:31 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

If the question is how much heat is added to a room that is the right answer. It is what air conditioning guys might want to know.
If the question is how much heat is created at the bulb (at the fixture) the 800 L rough service bulb gives you more. A complicating factor is whether the heat from the 2 bulbs is as likely to radiate from the fixture. Don has often said CFLs create heat that is not as radiant.
A question not asked (but probably obvious) is if you can use a smaller wattage halogen lamp that has the same useful lumens out of the fixture, the heat that is added to the room is smaller because the wattage is smaller.
--
bud--




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Andy adds: Another way of looking at it is: If you have 75 watts of power coming into the room, and nothing going out, the room will heat up. It doesn't matter whether it is a toaster, a light bulb, a space heater, a TV set, or an electric toothbrush. What matters is the amount of power going into a sealed room..... It ALL turns into temp rise unless there is a way for some part of it to radiate out.......
Andy in Eureka, Texas
PS I do not endorse using a 75 watt toothbrush as a toothbrush :>))))))
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RBM wrote:

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