pine ceiling

I would like to install 6" tounge and grouve pine on the cathedral ceiling of an addition. Any suggestions on how to keep the wood from darkening/yellowing over time. I dont plan to stain it, but keep it natural. However , I would like to coat it with poly, varnish, ect if it is necessary or recommended. Thanks, Mark S.
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All wood darkens a bit but real darkening of old ceilings is usualy the finish used, Shellac turns black and oil products dark amber. Acryilic-water base poly is what I used on my T&G pine ceiling.
Its winter and dry inside, even with humidifier, dont force tonges together tight or when its 90% humidity in summer it migh buckle out and don`t butt tight to walls, leave a gap and cover with moulding. I had an improper wood parkay floor that used to buckle up THREE inches in high humidity in summer because some idiot made no expansion room. Be sure wood is dry, use a moisture meter, or it will shrink too much.
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Is that a reason to do the install during the summer?
Banty
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Do it now, I did mine in the winter, thats why im recommending not hammering all real tight, but maybe im over cautious, floors are done in winter and hammered tight, but seeing the floor jump up in summer was good reason, I know for floors an edge gap is necessary .
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Haven't read that shellac turns black! Was used for YEARS prior to development of varnishes. Waterbased polyurethane doesn't amber like oil varnishes do and doesn't have the odor problem oil does.
On Sat, 10 Dec 2005 09:34:08 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

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nospambob wrote:

Try centuries. It's how French polishing is done, and was done on the finest furniture ever made. Most of the stuff you see in museums is French polished. I've never seen shellac turn black.
Water-based polyurethane is probably the easiest finish to use for that pine ceiling.
R
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Mark Schofield wrote:

My cabin out in the woods has exactly that on the ceiling. We did not apply anything. We don't smoke, fire place is natural gas fired. Almost 7 years passed and color is as new. Tony
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Try boiled linseed oil.

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No dont "Try" boiled linseed oil, it darkens alot.
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Mark Schofield wrote:

Wipe on some white oil paint thinned 50/50 with paint thinner then immediately wipe off all you can. The wood should be fairly smooth so paint can be wiped off without catching in roughness. After drying, clear coat with whatever.
The wood will still be a bit photosensitive but *much* less so and the clear coat won't darken it beyond whatever color may be inherent in the clear coat (water poly would work best).
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Sunlight and oxygen change wood's color. You'll get some color change pretty much no matter what you do unless you keep the area dark all the time. Best thing I would do is find a decent varnish or such with UV inhibitors in it. You could even go with an outdoor finish that came in clear. There are some out there that boat builders use but the stuff is pretty pricey (Sikkens comes to mind). Cheers, cc
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