pilot holes?

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Watching 'This Old House', they are forever driving various wood screws without drilling pilot holes. Recently, they did this with some decent-sized lag screws, to pull a couple of 2x8's together.
How does this work? ISTM that the threads would lock into each piece of wood, and the screw could not possibly draw the two pieces up - that the only way this could happen would be for the screw to strip in the 'top' piece'. It's hard to picture a lag screw doing this.
Obviously, though, it does work. What am I missing?
Thanks, George
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Usually there is some blank shoulder on longer screws. Enough so that there is not many threads in the top piece of wood.
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George wrote the following:

Dis you see the lag screws? Some have no threads a distance from the head end.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I've seen more than a few things on those home improvement shows that deviate from 'real world'.
Beyond a shadow of a doubt, everything shown is staged, rehearsed and edited to hype the episodes featured product/s and materials, and to motivate viewers up off the couch and into big box stores... or calling the contractor.
They're just thinly veiled infomercials...
Erik
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On 6/10/2011 11:00 AM, Erik wrote:

I remember seeing an interview of the woman who was a member of the his & her team on one of those shows. Every show would start out as if they were a couple and it was Saturday morning and they would decide to do something. First it was a plant stand or something trivial then a 60' multi level deck then a complete basement renovation including relocation of numerous service lines to accommodate the "environmental chamber" they picked out. All done in a weekend of course.
She explained how she had little idea of what she was doing and how everything was carefully choreographed by the manufacturers rep so she could walk in and set the last tile or drive the last screw.
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wrote:

Probably the one I used to tell my wife was phoney as hell. The doll was maybe 10-15 years younger than the guy. Just as you say, they talked but never worked. And never produced a bead of sweat, or got a speck of dirt on their "work" clothes. There was one gal whose show I could watch. Big gal. She rolled up her sleeves and did some work. Can't remember her name.
--Vic
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I've seen more than a few things on those home improvement shows that were just plainly a bad or poor or wrong way of doing things. And they jump in the time line, cutting out a few minutes or a few hours or a few days of normal time that would have to pass from one stage to another, and definitely cut out some work in that time, not showing it, and voila!, they're done in one day. Things in the real world that take a week. Go figger.
Steve
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On 6/10/2011 7:06 AM, George wrote:

Proper technique is to drill a pilot hole. This does two things, it minimizes splitting and lowers stress on the fastener when it is torqued in. A lot of things in construction can be either "see it works" or done properly for longevity.
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Pilot hole is one thing. Just a plain drill hole. Then there are lots of different pilot hole drills, that have a profile, drilling out the proper hole with taper and countersink, and even the proper depth of countersink so the head will be flush or recessed a little for some putty, or more recessed to finish off with a dowel. A GOOD set of countersink pilot drills are a very useful tool, prevent a lot of splitting, give a really good bite without putting a lot of stress on the wood so it may pop in the future, and just plain seat the fastener better in most cases.
I need a GOOD set, and believe I shall pick one up the next trip to the tool department. I emphasize GOOD, because they come in all grades, and a GOOD set will last longer and outperform a cheapie set.
Steve
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The principle sounds great, if they really are that easy/less expensive to manufacture, why don't you go into business?
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re: "I know how screws are manufactured..."
I'm not justifying the full cost, but the process of manufacturing a "medical device" is just a bit more expensive than manufacturing a drywall screw.
Aside from the added cost of producing, packing, storing and shipping a sterile product and all of the research and regulatory costs that have to be recouped, there's the tracking systems that must be in place so they can find all the people that have the rusting screws in their leg 20 years later, the insurance costs so they can compensate all the people that have the rusting screws in their leg 20 years later and pay the doctors to replace the screws in all the people that have the rusting screws in their leg 20 years later, etc.
Yes, $1800 is pretty steep, but the "real" number is still going to be magnitudes of order higher than anything you'll find on the shelf at Lowes.
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DerbyDad03 wrote the following:

And even more expensive than "medical devices" are "military devices".

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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that too; I have an appointment set up to have a plumber come over and do some really basic work on Saturday. A friend of mine asked why (knowing I was handy and had all the tools) my response: "the house is over 60 years old. I'm not paying for his material and expertise; I'm paying for his insurance and truck stock if something goes wrong." Yeah, I can *probably* repack a 63 year old spigot myself, but if something busts, I don't want to be making six runs to the store to fix it.
nate
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Medical screws are probably titanium- they're non-magnetic so they don't screw up an MRI (or, more properly, don't screw you up in an MRI). At least the ones in my elbow are titanium.
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The stuff holding my sternum together are some sort of non-magnetic wire, maybe Ti, maybe stainless steel with low Fe content. No problemo for MRI's. Had another just two weeks ago. When the tekkie asks about having iron in your body, or repair hardware, they seem not to be concerned about medical hardware, so it must have been designed with MRI's in mind.
Steve
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Good thinking. When my FIL passed away, we'd visit my MIL at the house they lived in for decades. They are 275 miles from us. I'd see things that needed fixing, but would not touch them. I can just see myself on a Sunday morning trying to get the city to come out and turn the water off at the street because nothing else would fully stop the flow. Eventually she sold the house "as is" and moved in with us.
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2011 23:46:37 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

See. You should have fixed it, even if you had to stay till Monday.
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wrote

Hey, mm, Ed is a good guy!! No implied bad-mouthing,please!!
LOL
--
Best regards
Han
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I did the cant shut water off event at my moms one saturday:( included flooding the basement:(
Made worse cause the city repaved the road and buried the shut off valve:(
I managed to get a new valve from the local hardware store, but walkied out without paying, fortunately I knew the owner:) He reported my shoews went squish squish squish as I left the store
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wrote:

I can just see that listed on the Wanted poster.
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