Picket Fence Question

I want to build a very simple picket fence. I've searched the internet, and lots of sites offer plans for sale. I don't need plans. Simple is plan-less! What I do need to know is, is there a standard space between posts, or do you sort of just measure your yard and then place them evenly? Or both?
Thanks in advance.
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wrote:

Picket spacing is determined by what animals you want to keep in or out.
My puppy required spacing slats about 2 inches apart. My neighbors used a 6 inch spacing.
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And that has what to do with post spacing?
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Steve Barker





"dKid" < snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net> wrote in message
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http://www.suzanne-eckhardt.com/http://www.intergnat.com/malebashing/http://www.intergnat.com/pussygames / There is no code or calculated spacing between support posts that I know of. Decide whether or not the ground will support lateral forces well; decide what kind of force the fence will have to resist; remember lumber comes in two foot incraments.
I'm rebuilding a 6 foot high board fence after about twenty five years. The posts are set in rather sandy soil. Each post is set in a bag of concrete and is about two feet in the ground. It has resisted folks of various size climbing over it. T
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The answer is yes, no, maybe, definitely, and it all depends.
Spacing may be dictated by such things as: how big/small yours or your neighbor's dog is; whether your fat neighbor is into nude gardening; how much wind you get; lots of things.
Once you decide what spaces you want between your slats, then, the problem of even spacing comes into play. If you can make the lengths of sections uniform, you can go with a regular spacing, and not have one at the end that is two inches shorter than the rest. On the last one, you may have to have one oddball spaced slat, but that's usually on a corner or in a corner, and not obvious.
Another thing you may do is put slats on both sides, allowing a flow of air, but a blockage of line of sight.
There's no standard unless it is meant to protect children from a pool, then local code will say how high, how close the slats, gate closing apparatus, and acceptable materials. There may be restrictions if you live in a HOA (UGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!) or have local codes on such things. Where I live, there are strict regulations on "walls", but almost none on "fences", so learn the difference, and you can tapdance through a lot of red tape.
HTH
Steve
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Again, that has what to do with post spacing?
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Steve Barker





"Steve B" < snipped-for-privacy@Neptune.com> wrote in message
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wrote:

I think plans are always a good idea, but you can probably draw your own.

A lot of pre-cut semi-round rails are 8 feet long. You can shorten them but to get longer ones, you might have to cut your own logs lengthwise. Or fell your own trees.
If I had a 30 foot run to do, I might make it 3 x 8 plus 6, but maybe I would make it 4 x 7 1/2. It might depend on how hard it would be for you to make the new ends of the rails the way the pre-cut ends were, and for that, you have to look at a pre-cut rail with the ends done (Maybe they sell rails without the ends done. I tend to think in terms of semi-round rails with the ends made thinner to sort of wrap around the posts.)
A lot of fence sections are pre-made, on a jig, at a wood shop. So they make them all 8 feet and let the last section in each run be shortened on site.
EVen for your single fence, you should probably make a jig also. It will save a lot of time. You can make one that allows for various length rails if you want to.
You want it to look nice to the eye. I'm not good at that so I just replace things as close to how they were first made as I can.
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In article

I think I may have been too vague. I don't need to know the space between slats, but between posts. In other words, will the posts be 6' apart, or 8', or does it depend on the length of the fence?
Thanks again.
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8^)~ Sue (remove the x to email)
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The prefab panels I bought today are 8 feet.
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Steve Barker





"Suzie-Q" < snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net> wrote in message
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Where there is no plan, there is no project. Even if it's just in your head, it's still a plan. If you cannot visualize in your head or transfer to paper your ideas then it might be helpful for you to buy a plan.
What I do need to know is, is

Eight feet is a standard length with all type of carpentry in the U.S. and boards are available in that length. Some boards called stud length are shorter, 93 inches. If you use standard length boards as the support for the pickets then no cutting will be required. This saves a lot of work and lumber.
So, if your post is 3 1/2 in wide (4x4) and the spacing between posts is 96 inches (8 feet) then you add one half of 3 1/2" to give you the distance on center between posts. In this example the posts would be 97 3/4" from each other on center. So that's how you do the math if you want to use standard length board for your picket supports whether it be 96" or 93".
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wrote:

In this design, why only half of the post width? Won't there be half a post width at each end? Are your rails toe-nailed to the posts, or attached with brackets. That seems to be a little more than a beginner should strive for, unless that is the particular design she really wants.
I think I have only seen fences with no overlap around the posts when the fence is rather formal, and painted, and even then I don't recall this for picket fences). The OP should decide in advance if she wants a natural wood fence or a sanded?, painted one.

I'll have to look at some more fences, and so will the OP.
At least with mine, there isn't 3 1/2 inches between rails, only a half or quarter inch or less. The rails have a part cut out at each end so that they wrap around my round posts, and the same thing could be done with square posts, so that the rails practically meet in the front. There are two pickets right next to each other, one on each rail. Although the fence sections are assembled elsewhere, the end pickets aren't put on until the rail is nailed to the posts.
So I think the posts are 8 feet on center.
Like you say, she needs a plan, with all these choices decided. In advance.

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In alt.home.repair On Wed, 06 Jun 2007 23:47:24 GMT Suzie-Q

The distance between the posts is determined by the length of the 2x4's you'll put between them. I measure 8' to center of the posts (using 4x4's)
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