Photocopy machine

Page 2 of 3  

Evan wrote:

A waste of resources and hardware. There is a public-domain script out there which calls a firmware routine built into most recent IDE/SATA drives, and non-destrutively clears the data table for them. Nobody short of a first-tier forensics company or NSA could recover them. The process is approved for sanitizing up to 'secret' level drives. And it is QUICK, unlike software-based wipe routines. A minute or two per drive.
The 'when in doubt, destroy' reflex is a sin, IMHO.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aemeijers wrote:

I use "Active Kill Disk Hard Drive Eraser" available here:
http://download.cnet.com/Active-Kill-Disk-Hard-Drive-Eraser/3000-2092_4-10188745.html
http://tinyurl.com/amhwg9
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/21/2010 3:27 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

http://download.cnet.com/Active-Kill-Disk-Hard-Drive-Eraser/3000-2092_4-10188745.html
This product works, every time, and is excellent for stress relief:
http://www.gardenerstoolshed.com/media/snow_nealley_mini_maul_lg.jpg
You don't have to use it for security only. If a device fails, becomes outdated, is just plain annoying, or if you've got the need for some true anger management and don't give a rip about destroying a moderately useful item, the MM is your tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have a Western Digital drive with a bullet hole in it over my work bench to remind me not to buy another one. That would have been very effective in rendering it unreadable, if it was still readable when I shot it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Apr 2010 15:12:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I seem to have a large fail rate with WD drives. I bought a SeaGate time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had a couple of SeaGates go over the past couple of years too. All manufacturers seem to lose the recipe periodically.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Years ago, there were some hard drives coming out of India, HOLLY MOELY! We had fun with them.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[SMF] wrote:

I like this one if you don't care about re-tasking the old drive:
http://www.edrsolutions.com/ordering.asp
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some windows programs allow for a drive reformat, which allows you to pass the drives along to charity, or ohter users.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 20, 7:48pm, "Stormin Mormon"

I hate to burst your bubble but if it is something that windows can do and someone has not yet tried to reuse the drive there are a multitude of programs out there that can *easily* undo it...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 19:50:45 -0700 (PDT), Evan

It all depends on what you do with windoze. The trick is you have to over write each sector with something. Otherwise the data is still there. It is only the directory entry that is changed when you "delete" . As I said in the other note, a simple DOS batch file will do it. I know it works with XP and I assume Vista and 7 maintain that ability. Of course guys like Norton sell some very capable disk wipers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 19:50:45 -0700 (PDT), Evan

military/Government security specs. - which means there is NOTHING recoverable on the drive - period.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 21 Apr 2010 21:05:40 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not true.
It is far from trivial to completely wipe a disk to make it unrecoverable without physically destroying the hardware as the final step.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 22 Apr 2010 07:40:21 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@nowheremonfrere.com wrote:

We are not talking about NSA that can do atomic analysis of the platters we are talking about some hacker with a PC reading the sectors directly off the drive. If you overwrite them you foil anyone who is not taking the drive apart and looking at the oxide. The problem is most operating systems do not really erase anything they just change the directory entry and that is easy to reconstruct. If you write over the whole surface, for all but the most capable forensic operations, that data is gone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

here is the 'quick scrub' utility I could not remember the name of in my previous post:
http://cmrr.ucsd.edu/people/Hughes/SecureErase.shtml
Your tax dollars helped pay to develop it, you may as well try it. Boot from a floppy and call it up, and it does a hardware call directly to the electronics on the drive, and tells it to lobotomize itself.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The only reason to be concerned is if you are making copies of your hairy butt.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stepfann King wrote:

What if you have no hair on your butt because toxic farts have burned it all off?
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 19:48:38 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

You can write a little DOS batch file of less than a dozen lines that will very effectively clear out a hard drive. You basically just do a quick format, then over write with a bunch of files a little smaller than the block size. (Yes XP still runs DOS batch files) That will stop just about anyone but NSA and they would have trouble if you looped it a few times. Most cases where people think they wiped a drive and didn't, involve just using "delete". All that does is change the first letter of the file name to a question mark so a DIR command can't see it. (Windoze works basically the same as DOS)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

(1) This is not bunk or an urban legend if CBS actually bought random copiers, ran the recovery program on the drives, and presented evidence of what they found.
(2) I think what many are forgetting here is that these storage drives are INSIDE a photocopier or network printer, and are not accessible by standard means unless one physically pulls the drive out of the unit and cobbles some way of installing it into a PC (or Mac, to be platform agnostic).
(3) Any reasonable data recovery program can recover more data than there is space on a drive. For example, when I had a 128MB compact flash card "go out" in the 118 heat of Phoenix in the Summer (why, oh, why did we go to Taliesin West in July?!?) my brother-in-law's copy of Easy Recovery Pro found more than 300MB of recoverable data. Yes, 2-1/2 times more data than the card's capacity. So if someone were to run that sort of software on a copier drive, they could recover many, many images that had been overwritten.
Food for thought for all of us...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In typed:

Yes, it is. Why?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.