Phonograph irregularity

I've got a brand-new Crosley CR73 phonograph, purchased for the purpose of transferring LP records to CD. It's brand-new in that I just took it out of the box, but it's been sitting in that box for a couple of years.
Is there something in the nature of phonographs that would make a new turntable turn irregularly simply by reason of having sat unused for a couple of years? At first I thought my LP was warped, but it happens with every LP I try.
Jim Beaver
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Belt drive or direct drive?
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What temperature was it exposed to?
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Nothing extreme, AFAIK. Room temperature. It sat in my office unopened for a couple of years.
Jim Beaver
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If it's belt drive, the belt might have distorted from sitting unused all this time.
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Correct, and if it's got one of those idler wheels (I think thats the right term), the wheel has rubber around the edges and it too could have a flat spot from sitting all those years.
However, I looked for your model on google and found this: http://www.storeyourmedia.com/vintage-record-player-3-cd-player-combo-in-3-finishes.aspx It says BELT DRIVEN.
Open the case and clean the belt and all points the belt contacts with a mild solvent such as 90% rubbing or pure alcohol. Put the belt back on and try it. If it still dont spin accurately, Replace the belt. There is a website that sells belts and idler wheels for all electronics such as VCRs, tape decks and record players. I was to that site once, but I cant tell you the name or url.
I just looked on google using the words "Turntable Belts" and found these sites, they might have it. http://www.action-electronics.com/beltf.htm http://www.turntablebelts.com
There are other sites as well. Google this link http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22Turntable+Belts%22&btnG=Search
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http://www.storeyourmedia.com/vintage-record-player-3-cd-player-combo-in-3-finishes.aspx
FWIW, brake fluid (yes) is used to restore rubber. If the belt is deformed, you might see an improvement after soaking in brake fluid for a short amount of time.
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Thank you all. You guys are amazing. I'll try these (and any other suggestions) and let you know.
Jim Beaver
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One more little detail. When you get the correct speed out of the unit and find that you are only getting a very faint recording this means that just like most turn tables there is no pre-amplifier. I have converted a few hundred LPs ( rare operas and classical music that are nowhere to be found in the wild) and bought a $20 Canadian pre-amp. I used a software called Diamond cut that was designed just for this purpose. The filters in this software are amazing, you can get rid of clicks, 60 Hertz hum, crackles with easy to use pre-defined filters or customize anything you want ( way above my head) etc...... Hours of fun :o)
Pre-amplifiers where not needed in the old days because when a Stereo had an input called PHONO there was a pre-amp in the stereo. Try finding an input called PHONO on a home theater today. Note that the word stereo is completely unknown today. Try going to an electronics store and ask for a stereo, it is hilarious to see the sales clerk's reaction. I have had one in Future shop run off and get his manager to find out what this possible new and strange technology could be. The manager was a retired old fella and he must have laughed for 2 minutes straight. The manager told me that he was sorry but the last one had been sold the previous X-mas.

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I suggest playing early Beatles for about twenty four hours. Start with Abby Road. Then move to "meet the Beatles".
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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http://www.storeyourmedia.com/vintage-record-player-3-cd-player-combo-in-3-finishes.aspx
Another source: http://www.needledoctor.com/
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on 9/6/2007 9:57 PM Jim Beaver said the following:

Perhaps the belt has developed a "set" from sitting so long. Try letting it run for a few hours.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Jim Beaver wrote:

If it has an idler wheel, it could have a dent in the rubber tire if it was left in the engaged position while in storage. You'll have to lift the platter to get at it. If it's a belt drive the other posts covered that. You may have to replace either drive part.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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I have a denon turntable that after storage of about 5 years wouldn't hold speed. Turns out that grease in the speed control (used to tweek the speed just a hair) had hardened. Cleaning the control with a good cleaner and lubricant fixed it.

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Just about finished transferring 300 albums and 700 45s. When I took my turntable out of storage I found the rubber band that drives the table shriveled up to a lump under the turntable.
After using online resources to find the replacement the turntable did the job.
Check the turntable drive mechanism.
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Swami looks into his crystal ball, and sees a direct drive turntable, with a depression in the big rubber roller.....
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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On Thu, 6 Sep 2007 18:57:08 -0700, "Jim Beaver"

Try to get yourself a round piece of metal or paper with a hole in the middle and a band of black and white squares which, under a fluorscent light, will tell you if the platter is spining at the right speed.
It should have bands for each intended speed.
If it is the right speed, the squares will appear not to move. Many tables had to be reset occasionally to turn at the right speed, but I don't know about belt drive.
In addition, if the speed is on target but varying, the boxes will move a little clockwise and then a little countrer clockwise.
Do this BEFORE soaking anyhing in anything, so you'll have a better idea what your problem is.
You never even said what the problem was, whether it was warp or woof or riggers or actually I forget the names of the two major problems.
You said it happens but didnt' say what happens. Said irregularly but didn't say in what way. I'm surprised no one asked. Different problems have different solutions. The two year storage time might be a red herring.
P&M
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