Phone ringer Troubleshooting

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One bank, I used to have account. Had two lights that were over the drive through windows. They had a color light, next to a colored light. I'd just have to wing and guess if the drive through was open, or not. If the one light was on, or if the other same colored light was on.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
And what about us poor slobs who are R/G colorblind?? I can tell if they're lit, that's about all.
The new green led traffic lights that are very bluishgreen are no problem, but the tiny green led's like on modems and indicators showing that something is powered on are a total loss if the color is supposed to mean something. And, 10% of all males are color-blind to some extent, and we are pretty much ignored by most electronic designers, unless they happen to be color-blind also.
When I was first married, my wife spent some time each week telling me resistor colors for my electronic projects, this was before I had a decent multimeter at home. At work I had a Simpson 260, I think it was.
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On 1/15/13 7:01 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Ya missed your chance to make a lawyer rich. That sounds like a lawsuit under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Your attorney could've gotten a new Lamborghini and you could've gotten a free year old calendar.
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Being in NYS, I'm no longer able to buy an attorney hunting license. Now, we trap and release, using cash, and tape recordings of "Help, I'm falling and can't get up".
Could use the calendar, though. Fewer of them as promos.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Ya missed your chance to make a lawyer rich. That sounds like a lawsuit under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Your attorney could've gotten a new Lamborghini and you could've gotten a free year old calendar.
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On Mon, 14 Jan 2013 21:04:09 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

You don't get to be astronauts.

Red in Europe is supposed to only be for safety warnings. I guess they make the situation even worse. They won't tell you! ;-)

They fixed that discrimination problem (in more senses of the word than one); most resistors now have no markings on them at all. ;-)
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I worked as an electrician in a large plant before retiring. In the later years that Europen color coding sure messed things up. Their red and green seemed backwards. On large breaker panels if it was colored red, it was on and dangerous to open. Green ment it was off and safe to open the panel. That is backwards to the American usage where Red was off and Green was on.
Having two standards that are backwards in the same plant is worse than no coding at all. It took a short period of time to get it in our heads not to pay attention to the color coding.
Reminds me of a service call I got one day. The operator was saying the macine would not start. I said " look you big dummy, try pressing the green button instead of the red button."
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Speaking of strange colored indicators (and morphing this thread even further) do you have the "flashing yellow left turn arrows" where you live?
Some genius decided that replacing the solid green left turn light with a yellow flashing turn arrow would be better.
Here's how they are using them:
The old configuration:
Dedicated left turn lane with a green arrow. Once the time period for the green left turn arrow has expired, the light turns full green. Drivers wanting to make a left turn have to wait until the oncoming traffic is clear before making the left.
The new configuration:
Dedicated left turn lane with a green arrow. Once the time period for the green left turn arrow has expired, a yellow flashing left turn arrow appears. Drivers wanting to make a left turn have to wait until the oncoming traffic is clear before making the left.
You'll note that in both cases the driver still has to wait until the oncoming traffic is clear before making the left, just like when making any left turn, whether or not there is a left turn arrow at the intersection. Why we suddenly need a flashing yellow arrow to "warn" us about turning left into oncoming traffic is beyond me.
They added one at the intersection where I turn into the office park where I work. There has always been an inordinate number of accidents at that intersection as people try to turn left into the office parks on both sides of the main thoroughfare. When they added the flashing yellow light, they sent around a notice about how these flashing yellow left turn signals have been found to reduce accidents in other parts of the country.
Well, trust me, it hasn't worked here. There are still numerous accidents at the insection and I would be willing to bet that the signal configuration is more confusing than the old standard. When I see a green light and I want to make a left turn, I wait until it's clear. I don't need a yellow flashing turn signal to tell me to wait until it's clear, especially if it's used only at a few intersections.
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wrote in message

Here's how they are using them:
The old configuration:
Dedicated left turn lane with a green arrow. Once the time period for the green left turn arrow has expired, the light turns full green. Drivers wanting to make a left turn have to wait until the oncoming traffic is clear before making the left.
The new configuration:
Dedicated left turn lane with a green arrow. Once the time period for the green left turn arrow has expired, a yellow flashing left turn arrow appears. Drivers wanting to make a left turn have to wait until the oncoming traffic is clear before making the left.
You'll note that in both cases the driver still has to wait until the oncoming traffic is clear before making the left, just like when making any left turn, whether or not there is a left turn arrow at the intersection. Why we suddenly need a flashing yellow arrow to "warn"

I don't recall seeing any flashing yellow arrows. I can see how that would make more sense than the green lights. I have see some intersections that only have green lights for the left turn and no arrows. That is confusing to me as I would think that green means go. If you are in a turn lane, even though the light is green, you still have to wait on traffic. That is the part that makes no sense at all to me.
I could almost see a yellow light or flashing yellow for the left turns where you have to wait on traffic.
Well, we do need lots of accidents. Helps the economy. More cars sold to replace the wrecks.
Also a part of population control. Gets rid of 30 to 40 thousand people a year. Good for the undertaker business.
Sometimes I think that roads are designed to cause problems for the above reasons.
.
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That's normal at intersections across the country. Green with no arrow means you have the right of way to go straight ahead (or turn right). A green arrow means you have the right of way to turn in the direction of the arrow.
Any time you don't have the right of way granted by a green light, you should exercise caution and make sure the path is clear of those that do have the right of way.
When I'm sitting in a left turn only lane, I don't need a yellow flashing light to tell me to be careful and only go when it's safe. I know to do that because I know to never turn across on coming traffic until it's safe. Heck, even with a green arrow I'm going to wait until I'm sure the oncoming traffic is going to stop before I enter the intersection.

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On Tue, 15 Jan 2013 12:09:26 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

The difference is that a flashing yellow is the equivalent of a yield sign. In that sense, it's more logical. ...though you always have to yield to oncoming traffic when making a left turn. Either should be intuitive.

Seems people there are uneducable. ;-)
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On Jan 15, 4:27pm, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

My point exactly. Since you always have to yield before making a left, the yellow flashing light is not needed. In addition, since it is extremely rare compared to just about every left turn lane we've ever been in, I think it adds more confusion to the situation than safety.
In any case, get ready for them. According to this video from the Michigan DOT, they will be required across the US soon. I'm a day's drive from Michigan but at least one has shown up around here already.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIkanxT72KI


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On Tue, 15 Jan 2013 17:04:03 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I've seen them (flashing green arrow, too, whatever that means). My guess is that it's a bone thrown to Eagle Signal for campaign contributions.
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On Jan 15, 8:18pm, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Were the flashing green arrows in the US?
In some Canadian provinces a flashing green globe or arrow means (used to mean?) that cross traffic or on-coming traffic had to stop. They were called "advance green" meaning if you saw it flashing, you could advance.
If I recall correctly from my service days in Germany, a flashing green meant that it was about to turn red - the equivalent of the modern day yellow light.
When I was growing up in NYC (Queens) some of the smaller intersections had 2-light traffic signals - green and red. When they were both on, it was the equivalent of the modern day yellow light.
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On Tue, 15 Jan 2013 17:40:17 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

I've seen them. I don't remember where it was, though.

I'll bet that's where it was.

I've seen that in NY (Poughkeepsie), too.
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Much of the male population is red-green color blind. So, that's not a totally useful approach.
Red versus blue would be much better color choice.
Yes, I do have red green color vision problems.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
There was a NASA rule that all stuff would indicate by green lights. If any warning came on it was red or yellow. When they started putting LEDs in equipment, there were only red lights. Things changed.
Greg
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On 01-14-2013 19:03, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I had a similar position teaching trobleshooting and maintenance for a sonar system. Most of it was digital, so the schematics showed the gates and flip-flops without showing the power supply.
So I opened the five volt line to one board. After they found that all the signals into several gates were good, and all the outputs were bad, they were baffled.
"What do all those dead points have in common?"
"Nothing"
"So five gates all went bad at the same time by coincidence?"
(Studies the book a while) "Hey, they're all on the same card!"
(LONG pause)
"Maybe we should check for five volts power"
--
Wes Groleau

“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers
  Click to see the full signature.
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As you probably know, badly-acting power supplies can do weird things to electronics. I used to turn power supplies down until the voltage was just enough get the units running. Every time the unit would power up, the symptoms would change.
The techs would diagnose one problem, turn the system off, swap in a part and power it back on. Typically something else would appear to be bad. They'd changed another board and the symptoms would change again.
Eventually they realized that something universal to every section of the equipment must be bad.
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On 1/15/2013 7:02 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

When I worked as a bench tech at a factory repair depot on two way radios, I had a transistor in a circuit that acted like an inductor changing the frequency of an IF circuit. The transistor checked out perfectly as a DC switch but behaved like an inductor in an RF circuit. At another job repairing industrial control boards from early 60's GE crane control systems, I found a transistor that had been installed backwards at the factory. Of course each circuit board was a flip-flop or comparator built out of discrete components in the days before IC chips. Have you ever worked on a control system that had and and nand gates built out of individual components? The MOV's on some of the circuit boards looked like AA batteries in shape and size. ☺
TDD
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My Dad had a machine he called a Varityper. Printed a left column, and then by typing the same text on the right, gave you a good, smooth right margin. Justified, I think it was called. Took a mylar ribbon, and fonts that looked like an upper partial denture.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Many years ago, I worked in a printing office. I operated a Varitype typesetting machine which imprinted various typefonts onto paper for photographing onto a litho printing plate. The tabletop machine had an electric motor that wound a large spring that ran the machine, every 22 characters that you typed would start the motor to wind the spring.
One day I started work, and entered the characters and got about two words into a sentence and it stopped dead. I checked the power cord and everything that I could think of but could not get it running. I called service, as it was on a maintenance and repair contract and looked for something to do for the next several hours.
The service man came in and took a look at it and flipped the switch from off to on. Embarrassment! What fooled me was that it started working and then stopped but I didn't think of the wound spring and look for a switch that had been turned off because it was normally never turned off. Then explain to the boss why nothing got done for half a day.
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I remember one early morning operations at Goldstone tracking station doing a satellite pass after working all night. Us four in the tracking RF section did all the prepass checks and back to back loops. Everything going good on acquisition. Running smooth, then no data or something like that. One RF guy to another, THROW THE SWITCH. Other RF guy looking at hundreds of switches says, WHAT SWITCH? Everything smoothed out after the right switch was throw.
Greg
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Orders from a Wiccan officer who tattle tales.
"Which switch, witch snitch?"
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I remember one early morning operations at Goldstone tracking station doing a satellite pass after working all night. Us four in the tracking RF section did all the prepass checks and back to back loops. Everything going good on acquisition. Running smooth, then no data or something like that. One RF guy to another, THROW THE SWITCH. Other RF guy looking at hundreds of switches says, WHAT SWITCH? Everything smoothed out after the right switch was throw.
Greg
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